Tag Archives: Mark Forsyth

Deals of the Moment- October 2017


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.



The Elements of Eloquence and The Horologican- Mark Forsyth

I’m always one to champion Mark Forsyth’s books about language

‘The Elements of Eloquence’ is a bit different from ‘The Horologican’ or ‘The Etymologicon’ because it’s about using words rather than the meanings of words. It’s probably more

Buy ‘The Element’s of Eloquence’ for £3.49 

Buy ‘The Horologican’ for £3.09


Why Have Kids?- Jessica Valenti

I’m mainly interested in this one because Valenti was a major contributor of ‘Yes Means Yes‘, a book I think everyone should read.

This one isn’t feminist as such but about the challenges of being a parent, and the cultural expectations around it. It sounds like an interesting read, but if it was more expensive I probably wouldn’t go for it, as is, maybe it being 99p makes it worth a try.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


The Road- Cormac McCarthy

Well, it’s a classic isn’t it?

The story of a man and a boy traveling through ravaged America

You can buy it….here (only £1.19)


The Help- Kathryn Stockett

I really enjoyed this book about black people who work as ‘help’ for white families and their rights.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)

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Deals of the Moment- August 2017


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks- Rebecca Skloot

I’ve heard a lot of good things about this one, but didn’t really know much about it. It’s about a woman whose cancer cells were taken without her knowledge (for medical science) and what happened 20 years later when her family found out.

You can buy it…here (only £1.19)


Fangirl- Rainbow Rowell

My favourite Rainbow Rowell so far. Reminds me of days in the depth of Harry Potter fandom. About a fanfiction writer starting university.

You can buy it…here (only £1.19)


Water for Elephants- Sara Gruen

About an almost-vet caring for animals in a circus during the depression. A really good book. The film is decent too, but makes more of the love story

You can buy it….here (only £0.99)


The Etymologicon- Mark Forsyth

I’ve raved lots about Forsyth’s (aka Inky Fool) books about words. Easy to read and very interesting. The Etymologicon is the best, and I recommend to everyone.

Buy it…here (only £3.09)


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Deals of the Moment- September 2016


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


Going Solo- Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl’s second autobiography, chronicalling his adult life, mainly his time in the RAF during WW2. As a child I prefered the first; Boy, but now I think I’d prefer this one, it’s been a long time, maybe I should re-read.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Inside the O’Brians- Lisa Genova

I enjoy Lisa Genova, so I’ll almost certainly buy this one. It’s about a cop diagnosed with Huntington’s, and the impact the inheritable disease has on him and his family.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


Where’d You Go, Bernadette?- Maria Semple

I’ve heard really good things about this book, but I’ve never read it, so I’m considering it. It’s about an amazing woman who goes missing, and her teenage daughter’s search for her.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Horologican- Mark Forsyth

The Horologicon, a book all about language, is one of my favourite books. Interesting, funny, entertaining, and easy to read. I recommend it to everyone.

You can buy it…here (only £2.79)

 

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Deals of the Moment- August 2016 (Part 1)


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

I have 28 tabs of deals open this month so I’m breaking this post into three parts; this part (part 1) is books I’ve already read, part two (hopefully tomorrow) will be books I own/can borrow but haven’t read yet, and part 3 will be books I’m interested in. My computer is going to the macshop tomorrow (l0ts of little problems) so I will try and get part 3 out on Friday but we will see how it goes.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


Still Alice- Lisa Genova

I really enjoyed this rather sad novel told by a narrator who has early onset dementia. It’s very touching, and language wise an easy read but also rather emotionally difficult

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


Fahrenheit 451- Ray Bradbury

To be honest I didn’t love this classic about book burning, but there were some points which made it worth a read.

You can buy it,,,here (only £1.99)


The Rosie Project- Graeme Simsion

I loved this funny, quirky, sweet book about a clever man who thinks he has found a clever way to find love. It was so much more than I expected

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Mockingbird- Kathryn Erkstien

A beautiful book about a girl with Asperger’s whose brother is killed. The normal grief of that situation added to her autism.

Buy it…here (only £1.39)

 


Girl at the Lion D’or- Sebastian Faulks

This book is actually the first in the trilogy which ends with, what is probably Faulks’ most well known novel, Birdsong. It’s probably my least favourite of the trio but it’s a nice little book about a girl who starts working at a slightly seedy hotel. I read the series in the wrong order and it does stand well as a novel on its own.

Buy it…here (only £1.99) Buy the others in the series, Charlotte Grey, and Birdsong, for £4.99 each.


 

The Secret Scripture- Sebastian Barry

Since reading The Secret Scripture I have read a lot of other Sebastian Barry novels, and none are as good as this one, I loved this one. About a woman who has spent most of her life in a mental institution

Buy it…here (£1.09)


Clovenhoof series- Heide Good and Iain M. Grant

Funny, political-ish books about satan being expelled from Heaven and being sent to live in Birmingham. I love these books, I’ve read 1-3 (and the short) and ordered number 4 when I saw it on offer, number 5 is out too, but that’s not on offer.

Buy one, two, three, four (only £0.99 each)


The Elements of Eloquence- Mark Forsyth

I love Mark Forsyth, his books about language are interesting and funny, I recommend them to everyone.

Buy it…here (only £1.19)


The Pact- Jodi Picoult

I love Jodi Picoult, I’ve read all her books. This one is about a boy and a girl who apparently had a suicide pact, or did the boy call the girl?

Buy it…here (£1.99)


Look Who’s Back- Timur Vermes

Hitler wakes up in the modern day. Everything is wrong, he must find his power again. Satirical, funny, a bit on the edge.

Buy it...here (only £0.99)


Middlesex- Jeffrey Eugenides

This is one of my favourite books. A sort of coming of age novel, kind of hard to describe, but there’s a family secret involved and I can’t tell you because that will spoil the story. Just read it

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


 

The Shock of the Fall- Nathan Filler

An incident happened, it effected the whole of one man’s life

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


Eleanor and Park- Rainbow Rowell

Eleanor is the new girl, she’s not fitting in great, but then she meets Park. A nice little love story.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Beach- Alex Garland

I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book about a secret island, and the things that happened there.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


How to Build A Girl- Caitlin Moran

Yay Caitlin Moran. How to Build a Girl is a little too autobiographical to feel like novel, but I still loved it.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)

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Deals of the Moment- June


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. This in the post where I talk about any books which are of interest.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews. Amazon links are affiliate links but any money made goes back into the blog (e.g. for giveaways)

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


1,411 QI Facts To Knock You Sideways

I’ve read a few QI books and they are interesting whilst still being easy reads. I’ve not read this one, and the fact books are good for a quick flick (although probably better in hardcopy) so I will probably buy it.

Buy it…here (only £2.59)


The Distant Hours- Kate Morton

I really like the gothic feel of Kate Morton books, and for a long time The Distant Hours was my favourite by her. It’s a bit of a mystery story about three sisters.

You can buy it…here (only £1.49)


The Princess Bride- William Goldman

Lots of people love the film ‘The Princess Bride’ but I’m more of a fan of the book. It’s just funny, and adventurous, and a little romantic. I’m concerned that the footnotes (which are a bit part of the humour) would get jumbled in the ebook version though, they’ve never quite worked in ebooks in my experience.

You can buy it…here. (only £1.59)


Fallen Angels- Tracy Chevalier

On one of my previous deals of the moment posts I considered a Tracy Chevalier book, but in the end didn’t buy it. I still sort of want to read another one after reading and liking The Girl With the Pearl Earring. This one is about friendship in the Victorian age

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Elements of Eloquence- Mark Forsyth

I’ve spoken before about how much I love Forsyth’s books about language. The Elements of Eloquence is about constructing your writing, and should be on the school syllabus, it’s interesting, knowledgable, and readable

You can buy it…here (only £2.59)


 

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Deals of the Moment- December


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Usually I tweet about the interesting deals and leave it at that, but a couple of months ago I decided to try sharing them more widely. There was nothing of interest last month but this month they have holiday offers too and there are a few interesting offers there

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


 

The Humans: An A to Z- Matt Haig

This is one I bought. A ‘guide’ for being human

I bought this one because I loved The Humans. You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


The Forgotten Garden- Kate Morton

The Forgotten Garden was my introduction to Morton from my pre-blogging days. I’ve since read all of Morton’s books, and whilst this is no longer my favourite (That’s probably The Distant Hours) it’s still one of her best. It looks into the mysteries in the past of a family and has Morton’s usual slightly gothic feel. You can buy it…here (only £1.79)


Bodies of Light- Sarah Moss

I’m interested in Bodies of Light because I enjoyed Moss’ other novel Night Waking, The two stories are linked with the main character of Bodies of Light being the sister of the main character in Night Waking. In Bodies of Light the main character is constantly striving to impress and gain affection from her mother. I’ve not bought it because I am unsure of the story itself. You can buy it…here. (only £2.49)

 


The Horologicon- Mark Forsyth

I really love the language books by Forsyth. I’ve read and loved The Etymologicon, The Horologicon and The Elements of Eloquence and thoroughly recommend them all. They’re smart, witty and humorous.

You can buy The Horologicon…here (only £0.99)


Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet- Jamie Ford


Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet is one of my favourite novels set during wartime. (It’s even in The List). It’s about Japanese-Americans during the second world war. You can buy it…here (only £0.99)



The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Trilogy in Five Parts- Douglas Adams

I must admit I think this one is a real bargain. Funny, geeky, quirky, I love The Hitchhiker’s Guide which follows Arthur Dent a guy who occidentally goes hitchhiking across space when Earth is destroyed. You can buy it…here (only £2.29)


 

 

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Review of the Year 2013- Non-Fiction


I’ve only read 4 non-fiction books this year. I thought I would list them all, although the best of these is clear for me.


The End of Your Life Book Club- Will Schwalbe is about a mother who is critically ill, and her son who connect through books as she reaches the end of her life.

 

 


The Elements of Eloquence- Mark Forsyth. Is about writing and speaking style and how to make what you say beautiful.

 

 


Friends like These- Danny Wallace. Is about Danny finding all of his childhood friends.

 

 


1,227 QI Facts to Blow Your Socks off. Another book by the QI team, full of interesting facts.

And the winner is…

The Elements of Eloquence

I love Mark Forsyth’s stuff. Always interesting, but told in an easy to read tone and with a lot of humour. I’m pretty sure reading this during NaNoWriMo helped my writing too.

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The Elements of Eloquence- Mark Forsyth



Disclaimer: This book was sent to me free of charge (by the publisher) in exchange for an honest review

Synopsis (from amazon)

In an age unhealthily obsessed with substance, this is a book on the importance of pure style, from the bestselling author of The Etymologicon and The Horologicon. From classic poetry to pop lyrics and from the King James Bible to advertising slogans, Mark Forsyth explains the secrets that make a phrase – such as ‘Tiger, Tiger, burning bright’, or ‘To be or not to be’ – memorable. In his inimitably entertaining and witty style he takes apart famous lines and shows how you too can write like Shakespeare or Oscar Wilde. Whether you’re aiming for literary immortality or just an unforgettable one-liner, The Elements of Eloquence proves that you don’t need to have anything to say – you simply need to say it well.

Review

When I heard Mark Forsyth had a new book coming out I was really excited. I had a bit of a book crush on The Etymologicon, and loved The Horologicon too. So I immediately snatched it up when Icon Books e-mailed me, and read it more or less straight away.

I was a bit unsure if I would like it as much as the previous two, because it was about using words rather than their meaning and history. It’s certainly less quotable (I did a whole separate post of snippets from The Etymologicon), but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t good, just different.

In some ways The Elements of Eloquence is more useful. You can use what is in it to make your writing, and speaking, better, or I suppose more stylised. A lot of the elements were things I recognised as being right, but didn’t really know why, it was interesting to see a bit of why. It was also good to learn the elements that I didn’t know.

I read this whilst doing NaNoWrimo, and I do think it improved my writing a little, or at least made me more aware of how I was writing things- even if I would have written it like that without reading The Elements of Eloquence.

Mark Forsyth is great to read. Easy, but interesting and informative. Intelligent and witty. I would certainly recommend his books to anyone interested in English and words. And his blog too. He was, after all, a blogger before he became a ‘writer’. I also recommend the hardback over the kindle version, it’s a beautiful book.

I certainly advocate a return to learning rhetoric in schools, and all the students should be set this to read! n fact they should just read it anyway.

4.5/5

Buy it:
Hardback (£7.23)
Kindle (£4.79)

Other reviews:
Have I missed your review? Post a link in comments and I will add it here.

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The Horologicon- Mark Forsyth


Disclaimer: I received The Horologicon free from the publisher via netgalley in exchange for an honest review

Synopsis (from amazon)

The Horologicon (or book of hours) gives you the most extraordinary words in the English language, arranged according to the hour of the day when you really need them. Do you wake up feeling rough? Then you’re philogrobolized. Pretending to work? That’s fudgelling, which may lead to rizzling if you feel sleepy after lunch, though by dinner time you will have become a sparkling deipnosophist. From Mark Forsyth, author of the bestselling The Etymologicon, this is a book of weird words for familiar situations. From ante-jentacular to snudge by way of quafftide and wamblecropt, at last you can say, with utter accuracy, exactly what you mean.

Review

I love, love, loved Mark Forsyth’s previous book The Etymologicon. So much so that I had to make a second post just to talk about all the words I tweeted about whilst reading it. I was super excited to read The Horologicon, and had planned to buy it when I went to a Mark Forsyth event which was meant to be last week (but was cancelled because apparently people in Birmingham don’t appreciate words *sob*), however when I saw it up on netgalley I snatched it up right away.

Maybe my expectations were too high but I didn’t like it as much.I think partially because it was in much bigger blocks. You couldn’t pick it up, read a paragraph and put it down again. That made it less tweetable, and also made it less easy to remember the words and information.

Maybe because it was on a less broad topic I found less of the words really interested me too, although I did tweet a couple which interested me. I did find I was telling other people about what I was reading rather than tweeting it because that broke my reading flow less. My boyfriend claimed that Forsyth made half the book up, but I think he’s  (my boyfriend) just being cynical.

I like the idea that you could skip between chapters depending on what time of the day it was, but it’s not very realistic. I did find occasionally my reading fit with what I was doing- and I think the experience was improved by that.

If you liked The Etymologicon you will probably like this one too, but if you haven’t read either I would recommend The Etymologicon over this one.

4/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£5.99)

Hardback (£7.92)

Other Reviews:

I know a few people on my blogroll are reading The Horologicon, but no reviews yet 😦

If you have reviewed this book drop me a line and I will add your link here.

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The Etymologicon- Mark Forsyth


Synopsis (from Amazon)

The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth’s Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words. It’s an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language, taking in monks and monkeys, film buffs and buffaloes, and explaining precisely what the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.

Review

I got a little bit addicted to the knowledge from this book while reading it, I miss tweeting the bits I found interesting. In fact I miss finding the interesting bits, hopefully following Forsyth’s Blog will help remedy that.

I really did enjoy this book. Anyone who follows my twitter feed can probably see I loved finding out about the words. (Soon was the Anglo-Saxon word for now, but humans are by nature procrastinators so the meaning changed. Did you know that?).

The writing was very conversational, which made it very easy to read and easy to understand.

I also loved how each chapter linked into the next by linking the words each chapter started and ended with. It did make it a little hard to put down however, which is not so good when you’re on a bus, or on your lunch break.

It also made me a little dead to the world, a number of times people started talking to me only for me not the notice.

Can’t wait to read Forsyth’s most recent offering, The Horologicon.

4.5/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£5.19)

Hardback (£7.40)

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