Tag Archives: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Deals of the Moment- May 2019


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but the money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

See all the books in the deals here (all 51 pages!)

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.

The 8th gen. kindle is also currently on offer for £49.99


Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking- Susan Cain

This book about why it’s good to be an introvert was very popular a few years ago. I enjoyed it and would recommend it simply because so many people connected with it, although I wouldn’t say I was overwhelmed.

Buy it for just £1.99



The Lovely Bones- Alice Sebold

Another one that other raved over but I thought was ok. The story of a girl what happens after a girl is murdered, told in her voice. It’s unique, although I didn’t really love that aspect.

It is on The Rory List though if you’re working your way through that!

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)



The Travelling Cat Chronicles- Hiro Arikawa

I’ve picked this book up half a dozen times in the bookshop, but never actually bought it. It’s the story of a man travelling around Japan with his cat. I don’t think I will buy it for my kindle, but because it’s a nice looking book, I’d rather own the physical version.

Buy here (only £1.99) 



Still Alice- Lisa Genova

I will forever recommend this real, sad, understanding, book about the professor who develops early-onset Alzheimers. My introduction to Lisa Genova who has fast become a favourite.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


Bad Science- Ben Goldacre

This is one I want to read, more so since starting my nursing degree. It’s about ‘fake’ medicine, and unscientific ‘science’.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Radium Girls- Kate Moore

I have seen so many great things about this book. It’s more or less definite that I’ll buy it. It’s the story of the women who used to paint glow in the dark hands on clocks; with radium paint, and what happened to them

Buy it…here (Only £0.99)


Everywoman- Jess Phillips

We read this as one of the books for our feminist book group. We all very much enjoyed her take on feminism and politics. If only more MPs were like her.

Buy it...here (only £1.99)



Dear Ijeawele- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Great little book about raising a feminist daughter. Well worth the read

Buy it…here (only £0.99)


The War on Women- Sue Lloyd-Roberts

Another bookclub pick. This one is important, but not easy. About the thing women are put through, and those who fight against it

Buy it…here (only £0.99)


 

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Little Feminist Reviews


My recent non-fiction jaunts have taken in a fair few feminist books, I wanted to review these books, but I don’t feel I have enough to say- or in some cases remember enough- to write full reviews, so I am going for some little reviews instead.

Men Explain Things to Me- Rebecca Solnit

Solnit is the inspiration behind the term ‘Mansplaining’ (although not actually a fan of the term herself). In this book she talks about men thinking they know better than women about things, and some of the serious consequences which can come from these presumptions. I didn’t expect it to be this serious, so in terms of subject it was a good read. However I didn’t really find it a good read…which may not have been helped by me getting annoyed at Solnit suggesting that violence is male. She sort of went back on herself but not before I’d posted a thread about it on twitter

Other people have loved it though. Try Heather’s review 

Buy it from £8.88

A History of Britain in 21 Women- Jenni Murray

This one was read as part if our feminist bookgroup (we’re reading ‘The Cows’ this month if you fancy joining us). I was expecting a history of Britain which was female based, maybe women who contributed to big historical events, or were the foundation of them. What we got was more of a series of biographies of women who Murray saw as feminist icons.

I will use Ali’s word and say that I had some quibbles. It was interesting in a historical sense, and included some women who were unknown to me, but I was unsure that I would call some women feminist icons.  The major one (and I think the one that our bookgroup had the most quibbles about) was Thatcher. Whilst she broke a major barrier for women she didn’t exactly show support for women.

Buy it from £5.03 or listen for free with an audible trial

Dear Ijeawele: Or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

This book is a copy of a letter that Adichie wrote to her friend with recommendations on how to raise a feminist daughter. It has some really good ideas, and I think it’s well worth a read, especially for parents.

Buy it from £2.99 or listen for free with an audible trail

 

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Deals of the Moment- March 2018


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.

There are so many books that are/look good this month. Lots of them are feminist in nature (I guess because it’s women’s history month), I love feminist books but I know that lots of people prefer to read fiction, so I’ll put them at the end.


A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Beginning- Lemony Snicket

I didn’t read ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ when it came out, mainly because the covers made it look like a rip off of Harry Potter, but since then I’ve watched the netflix show which has proven me wrong- and made me want to read it (although I tend to find books harder to read after I’ve seen the film/show)

Buy it for just 99p



Grief is The Thing With Feathers- Max Porter 

I’ve not reviewed this one on the blog yet but it’s beautiful, sad, and a little strange. It’s about a family in which the mother/wife dies and includes a crow.

You can buy it…here (only £2.89)


The Red Tent- Anita Diamant

I’ve been wanting to read this for ages, it’s about women in the time of Jacob.

You can buy it….here (only £1.19)


The Restaurant at the End of the Universe- Douglas Adams

Second book in the very entertaining ‘Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ series. The first is only £1.89 too

You can buy it…here (only £1.19)


The Thirteenth Tale- Diane Setterfield

Great, and well known gothic tale. Well worth a read.

Buy it…here (only 99p)


Women and Power- Mary Beard

Another one I’ve been wanting to read for a while. About powerful women throughout history and how they have been treated.

Buy it…here (only £2.99)



Everywoman- Jess Phillips

A rallying call to women to stand up and speak out.

Buy it…here (only 99p)


Dear Ljeawele- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Book of suggestions on how to raise a feminist daughter, a follow on from ‘We Should All Be Feminists’

Buy it…here (only 99p)


Delusions of Gender and Testosterone Rex- Cordelia Fine

Two books about how gender is viewed and created. Delusions of Gender is more focused on girls whereas Testosterone Rex has a greater focus on boys

 

Buy ‘Delusions of Gender’ (only £1.99) and ‘Testosterone Rex’ (only £4.29)

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Deals of the Moment- August 2016 (Part 2)


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

I have 28 tabs of deals open this month so I’m breaking this post into three parts; this part (part 2) is books I own/can borrow but haven’t read yet, part 1, yesterday, was books I’ve read, and part 3 will be books I’m interested in. My computer is going to the macshop tomorrow (l0ts of little problems) so I will try and get part 3 out on Friday but we will see how it goes.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


On Beauty- Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith is one of those writers I’ve always wanted to read, but sometimes never got around to. On Beauty, a story about love and feuding families is on my Mum’s shelf.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Secret Life of Bees- Sue Monk Kidd

I bought this one when I saw how cheap it was. It’s on the Rory List and I’ve heard good things about it.

You can buy it,,,here (only £0.99)


Americanah- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Another author I’ve always meant to read (I have read We Should All Be Feminists, but that doesn’t really count). My sister has Americanah so I may be able to borrow it at some point. It’s about two refugees from Nigeria who were in love but ended up in different parts of the world.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


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We Should All Be Feminists- Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie


Synopsis (from amazon)

A personal and powerful essay from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the bestselling author of ‘Americanah’ and ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’, based on her 2013 TEDx Talk of the same name.

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay – adapted from her much-viewed Tedx talk of the same name – by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of ‘Americanah’ and ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’. With humour and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century – one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviours that marginalise women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences – in the U.S., in her native Nigeria – offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike. Argued in the same observant, witty and clever prose that has made Adichie a best-selling novelist, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman today – and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.

Review

I wanted to read this little book, or essay if you want after seeing it around on a few blogs.

For me despite it being so short it still seemed to have things which longer feminist writings have. It said a lot of the same things that Everyday Sexism says, but I didn’t review that because it made me angry for the wrong reasons. We should All Be Feminists talks of some of the same sort of level of sexism, a sort of thing which seems so ingrained that it’s almost seen as normal and therefore acceptable.

She also talks of the sort of attitudes towards feminists which makes feminism into some sort of bad words. I know women who would say that they aren’t feminists, but that’s like saying men are better, that they should get better chances and opportunities. How can you be a woman but not be a feminist?

She talked widely of her experiences in Nigeria- her native country, and made it seem that sexism is worse there, maybe it s, maybe not, it could just be what she is sharing.

It’s a good book for people who wouldn’t really consider themselves as being feminists, women and men alike.

I feel my own review is lacking something, I wish I hadn’t left it so long. Bex’s review is what convinced me, and is much better than mine.

4/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£0.99)

Paperback (£4.00)

Other Reviews:

An Armchair By the Sea

Did I miss your review? Leave me a link in comments and I will add it here.

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