Tag Archives: Axel Scheffler

Children’s Hour: Stick Man


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

Stick Man is a favourite for our pre-schoolers at the moment (we got this, Zog, A Squash and a Squeeze and Monkey Puzzle recently and Stick Man is the favourite). It’s about a stick man who keeps getting mistaken for a normal stick, with worse and worse consequences. It has Santa in it, so you could get away with using it as a Christmas book, but he’s barely in it, and Christmas is only in it a little too so it doesn’t have to be a Christmas book.

As with all Julia Donaldson books it has that tried and tested formula, rhyme and repetition, helped along by Axel Scheffler’s lovely illustrations.

It makes it easy to follow for the kids. They love joining i with “I’m Stick man, I’m Stick Man, I”M STICK MAN, that’s me”, and enjoying seeing the adults shouting and being silly too.

It’s on 3 for £10 on amazon at the moment too

Buy it:

Paoerback (£3.85)

Boardbook (£4.79)

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Children’s Hour: Superworm


Children’s Hour is a feature posted every Thursday here at Lucybird’s Book Blog. Children’s Hour is my time for reviewing children’s picture books. In my job in a nursery I encounter lots of children’s books, and these are the books I use for Children’s Hour.

You can find links to past Children’s Hour posts here.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.


This week I read my Children’s Hour choice, Superworm, to the pre-schoolers. Superworm is a hero who loves helping the other insects

“Superworm is super long

Superworm is super strong

See him wiggle

Watch him squirm

Hip-hip-horray for SUPERWORM”

but one day Superworm gets into trouble, and it’s time for the other insects to be the heroes.

The kids obviously love this book. They pretty much know it off by heart, to the point where they could tell me what was on the next page before I’d read it.

It’s quite good to read as an adult too, has a fairly interesting plot where picture books are concerned.

And the usual Julia Donaldson rhythm and rhyme is always popular!

Buy Superworm:

Hardback (£5.00)

Paperback (£6.04)

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Children’s Hour: The Gruffalo


Children’s Hour is a feature posted every Thursday here at Lucybird’s Book Blog. Children’s Hour is my time for reviewing children’s picture books. In my job in a nursery I encounter lots of children’s books, and these are the books I use for Children’s Hour.

You can find links to past Children’s Hour posts here.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

I mentioned a few weeks ago that we had introduced the toddlers to The Gruffalo (well I say introduced but a lot of the kids already know The Gruffalo, one even has the cutest Gruffalo hoodie which I mentioned in one of my Christmas gift posts). The Gruffalo is actually a pretty clever story. Mouse is smart. All the animal think he looks good to eat but mouse manages to trick them by making up a scary monster- The Gruffalo, who loves to eat other animals. But did mouse really make-up The Gruffalo, or is he real? And what will happen if mouse meets him?

The Gruffalo has the traditional rhyme and rhythm of a Julia Donaldson book but in some ways is a little more sophisticated. Partly because mouse is clever, and partly because of all the differences, the strange food which excite the imagination. It’s an enjoyable book to read to the kids, and they enjoy it too.

There is a sequel to The Gruffalo, The Gruffalo’s Child, but I wasn’t very impressed by it. There is also a film.

Buy The Gruffalo:

Paperback (£4.00)

Board Book (£4.99)

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Children’s Hour: Monkey Puzzle


Children’s Hour is a feature posted every Thursday here at Lucybird’s Book Blog. Children’s Hour is my time for reviewing children’s picture books. In my job in a nursery I encounter lots of children’s books, and these are the books I use for Children’s Hour.

You can find links to past Children’s Hour posts here.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

We have recently introduced Monkey Puzzle and The Gruffalo to our toddlers, and both have been rather popular. Monkey Puzzle follow a monkey and a butterfly as they look for the monkey’s mum. Butterfly tries her hardest but just keeps getting it wrong. The kids love pointing out what the different animals are and laugh when monkey dispares of butterfly, especially when it’s the elephant again.

No! No! No! That’s the elephant again!

As with all of Julia Donaldson’s books Monkey Puzzle has a rhyme and rhythm to it which makes it easy and interesting to follow, and of course it’s accompanied by those beautiful pictures by Axel Scheffler.

It’s probably a bit more simple in storyline terms than most of Donaldson’s other books but I think that makes it a good introduction to her work, it’s easier for younger children to follow.

Buy Monkey Puzzle:

Paperback (£4.00)

Board Book (£4.79)

Big Book (£10.87)

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Children’s Hour: A Squash and a Squeeze


Children’s Hour is a new feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

Image from Amazon

A Squash and a Squeeze was a favourite book in toddler room when I started being based there, but is disappeared, this week it has reappeared so we’re introducing the story to a whole new group of toddlers. A Squash and a Squeeze it the story of an old woman who thinks her house is just to small. She goes to a wise old man for help and he tells her to “Take in your hen”…so she does and returns to the wise old man who tells her to take in increasingly large animals until she has a hen, a goat, a pig and a cow in her house…and it really is A Squash and a Squeeze . Then he tells her to take the animals out again, of course in comparison her house is enormous! Really the message behind this story is to be grateful for what you’ve got.  The woman’s house may not be bigger but at least she has a house, and it’s all hers. Of course the children don’t really get this message but they still enjoy the story. They find the idea of having all those animals in your house funny- especially when the cow is dancing on the table. They like the rhymes too, and the repetition which makes it easy for them to ‘read’ it themselves.

I like to imagine that the old woman is gradually getting more cheesed off with the wise old man as he keeps giving her what seem to be stupid solutions (she just wanted him to come and build an extension really), and he wise old man laughing as she seems to blindly follow them.

Buy A Squash and a Squeeze:

Paperback (£3.89)

Boardbook (£5.39)

Braille (£5.99)

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