Tag Archives: Attachments

Deals of the Moment- June 2020


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but the money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

See all the books in the deals here

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.



The Help- Kathryn Stockett

Do you remember when this was super popular a few years ago? If you missed it then you can read it for cheap now. It’s taken from the view of black maids in white households (who are not nice). It is a good book, although maybe when you consider context a little problematic. So maybe not the best to read if you want to understand black history.

Buy it for just £0.99


Adults- Emma Jane Unsworth

I was surprised this is so cheap because it’s relatively new and not out in paperback yet. I read it a few months ago and suggested it for my bookgroup, but we decided not to read it at the time due to the price.

It’s the story of Jenny, who seems rather vapid and self-obsessed to start with, but once you get to know more of her story you realise what hides behind it, and that maybe her self-obsession isn’t quite that. A very good read but it takes some getting into.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


The Hunger Games- Suzanne Collins

I’m not the worlds biggest YA fan in general, but I enjoy a dystopian novel, and this is the start of a very good series.

‘The Hunger Games’ are ‘games’ set up by the elite as part of controlling the population. Each district has two young tributes every year, only one tribute will come out alive.

Buy here (only £2.49) 


How to be Famous- Caitlin Moran

I really enjoyed the first book in this series How to Build a Girl, as soon as I saw this was on offer I bought it. It continues the story of Johanna, young music journalist and her (mis)adventures in the Britpop scene.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


The Closed Circle- Jonathan Coe

Another one I bought immediately on seeing it. This is the follow-up to ‘The Rotter’s Club’. Set during the time of the ‘War on Terror’ it will be interesting to see the view of terrorism now vs. how it was during the time of the IRA (The Rotter’s Club is set around the Birmingham bombings)

Buy it…here (only £0.99)



Attachments- Rainbow Rowell

‘Attachments’ is the story of an IT tech who falls in love with a woman through reading her e-mails. I can’t remember much about it except that I enjoyed it and it was an easy read. 

Buy it…here (Only £0.99)


Seven Signs of Life- Aoife Abbey

A medical memoir focusing around an intensive care doctor. Also pretty glad this one is written by a woman, as they generally seem to be written by men.

Buy it...here (only £0.99)


The Lake House- Kate Morton

As usual for Kate Morton half historical novel half mystery. Lots of intrigue. This one focuses on the disappearance of a baby, and the secrets which surround it.

Buy it…here (only £0.99)


Also, quick mention Room is cheap again, this seems to happen every few months so I’m not bothering to go into a big song and dance, but you can get it for 99p if you want!

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Attachments- Rainbow Rowell



Synopsis (from amazon)

It’s 1999 and for the staff of one newspaper office, the internet is still a novelty. By day, two young women, Beth and Jennifer, spend their hours emailing each other, discussing in hilarious detail every aspect of their lives, from love troubles to family dramas. And by night, Lincoln, a shy, lonely IT guy spends his hours reading every exchange.

At first their emails offer a welcome diversion, but as Lincoln unwittingly becomes drawn into their lives, the more he reads, the more he finds himself falling for one of them. By the time Lincoln realizes just how head-over-heels he really is, it’s way too late to introduce himself. What would he say to her? ‘Hi, I’m the guy who reads your e-mails – and also, I think I love you’.

After a series of close encounters, Lincoln decides it’s time to muster the courage to follow his heart? And find out whether there really is such a thing as love before first-sight.

Review

Everybody seems to love Rainbow Rowell right now. I was intrigued to see what was so special about her. Even people who don’t normally review YA seemed to love her, so I thought there must be something. I went for Attachments because it’s her adult novel. I thought it would be  the most…sophisticated, I guess.

I did I suppose expect chick-lit, it sounds like chick-lit. It’s probably the category that Attachments most easily fits into. The style is a little different though. For one thing the main focus is probably Lincoln, where it would usually be a woman in chick-lit. There was a strong focus on Jennifer too, but maybe a little less than to Lincoln. We mainly saw her through her e-mails, we knew a little more about her than Lincoln did, but mainly we knew her as Lincoln did.

I’m not sure why more chick-lit isn’t written like this- with the reader seeing how the man thinks and feels. Surely he can be more attractive if you can see what he is really like? How much he loves his leading lady? With Lincoln it seems even better because he doesn’t know what Jennifer looks like. He falls in love with her personality, before he become physically attracted to her.

In terms of chick-lit it’s very good. Cute. You feel you really get to know the characters, you can see why Lincoln loves Jennifer, and you can love Lincoln himself. Plus there is a very everyday type feel to it. No real dramatic romantic moments, just real life. No perfect, a few pitfalls. Real.

I like the kindle cover, by the way, it’s like one of those magic eye pictures.

4/5

Buy it:
Paperback (£5.59)
Kindle (£3.99)

Other Reviews:

Have I missed your review? Leave me a link in comments and I will add it here.

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Filed under Chicklit, Contempory, Fiction review