Tag Archives: Artie Van Why

Top 10 Indie


Top 10 Tuesday is a meme hosted every Tuesday at The Broke and the Bookish where bloggers compile lists of different top 10s. This week it’s free choice

Top Ten Indie Authors/Books

I think as bloggers we are in a great position to promote indie authors. Unlike professional reviewers we can read whatever we want and that means we can more easily review lesser known authors and books. I have read some great indie authors (and let’s face it, some not so great ones!). I’m not sure if I can make 10 but for once they are sot of in an order of preference, 1 being first of course!

1) Scott StabileIf you’re a regular reader of this blog you may well know how much I love Scott Stabile’s Brooklyn Bites series of short stories. I’m not a big reader of short stories but I adored these. The descriptions of food and sense of relationships are particularly good. Read my reviews 1, 2, 3. Stabile has also co-written some children’s stories, a children’s film, a crime show, has a full length novel in the works, and plans for a further volume of Brooklyn Bites (does this guy ever sleep?).

2) Linda Gillard I first encountered Gillard as a published writer but she now self-publishes as she often find publishers want to pigeon-hole her books a bit. Her last 2 (possibly 3, although I have a feeling one had been published before?) novels were completely self-published (House of Silence, The Glass Guardian, possibly Untying the Knot), and her first three (A Lifetime Burning, Emotional Geology, Star Gazing) were ‘professionally’ published in the past. My favourite is A Lifetime Burning, closely followed by House of Silence.

3) That Day in September- Artie Van Why  this 9/11ir is incredibly moving without a shred of self-pity. It’s not easy to read in an emotional sense but it’s one of those types of books you should really give a try to. That Day in September was originally written as a play (which has been preformed off-Broadway) before it became a book.

4) My Dead Friend Sarah- Peter Rosch A crime/mystery novel with a bit of a twist, My Dead Friend Sarah follows a man who attempts to prevent the abduction and murder of a woman he has dreamt about. It’s a novel I can see appealing to a wide variety of readers and is one of the most professional self-published novels I have come across.

5) Pegasus Falling- William E. Thomas: essentially Pegasus Falling is a war novel, however it is more of a novel about the effects of war than about the war itself. There is also a love story element which has some messages about love. Pegasus Falling is the first book in The Cyprus Branches Trilogy, the second part It Never Was You is due out later this year.

6) 27- R.J. Heald This novel has an air of One Day around it which could make it very popular, but I actually preferred it. A perfect one for 20-somethings.

 

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Filed under Memes, Top 10 Tuesday

That Day in September- Artie Van Why


Cover of "That Day In September"

Cover of That Day In September

This book was sent to me free in exchange for an honest review

Synopsis (from Amazon)

We all have our stories to tell of where we were the morning of September 11, 2001. This is one of them. In “That Day In September” Artie Van Why gives an eyewitness account of that fateful morning. From the moment he heard “a loud boom” in his office across from the World Trade Center, to stepping out onto the street, Artie vividly transports the reader back to the day that changed our lives and our country forever. “That Day In September” takes you beyond the events of that morning. By sharing his thoughts, fears and hopes, Artie expresses what it was like to be in New York City in the weeks and months following. The reader comes away from “That Day In September” with not only a more intimate understanding of the events of that day but also with a personal glimpse of how one person’s life was dramatically changed forever.

Review

I feel that words cannot really describe my thoughts on this book, it completely blew me away. I will try my best to put my thoughts into words, just don’t expect too much!

At first I was a little unsure about reading a book based on September the 11th, not because I had no interest in the subject but because there was a part of my that thought it didn’t seem right to make money out of a tragedy such as that day, but once I started ‘getting to know’ Artie I didn’t feel that way any more. It felt more like he was helping people to understand while relieving his own pain. I can imagine that writing about what happened that day must have been difficult for him.

In terms of read-a-bility for such a difficult matter That Day in September was surprisingly easy to read. The book was short (less than 100 pages) and the language was simple, so I managed to read the whole thing in less than an hour while waiting for the boyfriend in a coffee shop. However the simplicity didn’t take anything away from the subject matter (at least in terms of  emotional impact), if anything it let events speak for themselves. I liked that Van Why left things unsaid, sometimes words cannot match an emotion or an image, who can really describe what we all saw (whether in person or through the television) that day?

I did find myself wanting to e-mail Van Why as soon as I had read the book. Wanting to write about what I had read and urge you all to read it. What a shame I was nowhere near a computer!

5/5

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Filed under Biography, History, non-fiction review