Category Archives: Memes

Sunday Surfing 15/10/17


bird surf
Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

I was very lazy last week and posted nothing, so this is 2 weeks worth of links

Around the web this week

18 Book Characters Who Accurately Represent Mental Illness

Nicholas Flamel will be in the Next ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Film

Podcasts For Book Lovers

Beautiful British Libraries

Books That Helped People Through Hard Times

 

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

Heavenali’s Review of ‘Strong Poison’

The ‘House Cup Reading Challenge’ Starts Today

 

And on the blog this week…

Great Kindle Deals for October

The Kids read ‘Mr Big’

I Signed up for ‘The House Cup Reading Challenge’ 

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Sunday Surfing 1/10/17


bird surf
Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Authors Responses to Their Books Being Banned Harper Lee is so savage!

J.K Rowling Isn’t Going to Give Fans Something They’ve Been Asking for This has to be ‘The Scottish Book’, right?

Banned Children’s Books to Read

 

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

‘Tomes With Tea’ is Doing a Number of Blogger Spotlights Whilst She’s Away

‘Book Chatter’ Talks About Books With Autistic Characters

 

And on the blog this week…

I Reviewed ‘Choose to Rise: The Victory Within’

The Kids read ‘I Want My Potty’

 

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Sunday Surfing 24/9/17


bird surf
Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

How Winnie the Pooh Swallowed Two Lives

This post about Loving Books reads almost like a love letter

Read Extracts from all the Books on the Booker Short List

 

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

Lit and Life’s Review of ‘The Martian’ made me remember why I added it to my wishlist

 

And on the blog this week…

Film of the Book: The Circle

The Kids read ‘My Mum’

 

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Sunday Surfing 17/9/17


bird surf
Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

The Strangest Requests made of Booksellers and Librarians

Apparently Roald Dahl Intended for Charlie of ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ to be black

The Bronte’s Game is Becoming a Children’s Novel

Every Book J.K Rowling Has Ever Recommended

 

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

So You Want to Read Ian McEwan?

 

And on the blog this week…

Top 10 Tuesday was all about the Best Books Read in the History of the Blog

The Kid read ‘Mr Bear says Can I Have a Hug?’

 

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Top 10 Tuesday: Books Read in the Lifetime of this Blog


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday which means it’s time for ‘Top Ten Tuesday’ from  The Broke and the Bookish is back today, this is a freebie week looking back, so I’ve decided to do the best books read in the lifetime of this blog

These books were top of my review of the year lists for the years I read them.

As always, in no particular order.

Living Dolls- Natasha Walters

This was my top non-fiction book which I read in 2011. It is still one of my most recommended books and it got me into feminist reading.

About how society breeds girls.

 

The War of Don Emmanuel’s Nether Parts- Louis de Bernieres

After years of searching I found a book by de Berniere’s which met up to (and suppassed) Captain Correlli’s.

This story about a fictional latin American country going through civil war is one of my favourite ever and was my best fiction read of 2011
Pop Co.- Scarlett Thomas

This was my favourite fiction read of 2010.

About code breaking, advertising, mystery, and a little political

 

Handle With Care- Jodi Picoult

This 2009 read is still my favourite Picoult as it has a theme which I really connect with. About a girl with brittle bones and how her mother is suing the midwife who missed the signs in scans



Life After Life- Kate Atkinson

This story of reliving lives is still a favourite of mine since being my favourite read in 2013


How to Be a Woman- Caitlin Moran

This is the funny, feminist book by Caitlin Moran which made me want to be her friend. I read it back in 2012

Brooklyn Bites Series- Scott Stabile

Oh it’s been so long since I’ve got to rave about Brooklyn Bites. These beautiful short stories are so perfectly descriptive of food that you can almost taste it.

Texts From Jane Eyre- Mallory Ortberg

This funny little book suggests how texts from famous literary characters would be like

Yes Means Yes- Various

An important and interesting feminist book which I read earlier this year and wrote lots of posts about.

 

How to Be a Heroine- Samantha Ellis

In this great book Ellis looks back at previously loved books with a new perspective

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Sunday Surfing 10/9/17


bird surf
Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

This Bookshop Travels the World Selling Books

Favourite Books of Famous Authors

The most Popular Reviews on Goodreads

The Most Common and Strangest Books Which have Been Left at B&Bs

Authorised Prequel for ‘Dracula’ Based on Stoker’s Notes to be Published

‘House on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet’ is Being Made into a Film I hope it does the book justice, read my review of the book here

The Story Behind the ‘Winnie the Pooh’ Illustrations

Can You Find Wally in 360º?

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

It’s Almost Ninja Bookswap Time 

And on the blog this week…

Top 10 Tuesday was all about Books I Abandoned

I Looked at This Month’s Kindle Deals

I Reviewed ‘The Circle’

There’s Still a Few Hours Left to win ‘Yes Means Yes’ enter at the bottom of the review

 

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Top 10 Tuesday: Books I’ve Given Up On


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday which means it’s time for ‘Top Ten Tuesday’ from  The Broke and the Bookish is back today, this week is about books we’ve given up on.

I have a special rule after I almost gave up on Harry Potter the first time, I have to read at least 50 pages before I allow myself to give up, and often I do end up deciding it may not be the right time.

I’ve tried to pick books/authors which are well known, maybe you can convince me to try again?!

As always, in no particular order.

A Suitable Boy- Vikram Seth

I tried to read this very popular book when I was at uni. I persevered for a long time, and still have it on my shelves in the hope I will one day be able to find out what it is that made so many love it. I found it slow, and pretty hard going. I finally gave up on in when I spent a whole train journey picking it up only to shortly decide staring out a window was better entertainment.
The Hunchback of Notredame- Victor Hugo

I tried to read this one for The Rory List. Getting to 50 pages was difficult. It was rambling and mainly seemed to be complaining about Parisian architecture. I finally started getting interested in the story just before 50 pages, then Hugo went off on another waffling ramble and I threw the book across the room. It’s half the reason that Les Mis is still on my kindle unstarted.

Birds Without Wings- Louis de Bernieres

I have a strange relationship with Louis de Bernieres books. I found the first chapter of ‘Captain Correlli’s Mandolin’ really difficult but loved the rest of the book, I didn’t really like  ‘The Partisan’s Daughter’ until I’d finished it, ‘The War of Don Emmanuel’s Nether Parts‘ is one of my favourite books of all time, but the sequel I recently put to the side. ‘Birds Without Wings’ I technically put to the side, it’s still on my shelves, but I doubt I’m going to finish it as it’s not been touched since uni.

Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights- Salman Rushdie

I was really excited when I got accepted to read ‘Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights’ on netgalley after I’d loved ‘Midnight’s Children’, and I really persevered with it. There were some elements that I liked but it just didn’t click and I found I was picking it up less and less.

Vanity Fair- William Makepeace Thackery

Another classic picked up from ‘The Rory List’. I do often find classics a struggle. With this one I didnt even manage my 50 page rule with this one because I had in my bag when a water bottle leaked, and I decided I was kind of glad so didn’t try and save it. I swear I usually look after my books better!

J- Howard Jacobson

I must admit I requested this one from netgalley because The Finkler Question had recently won The Booker. I’d never read any Jacobson before, and this one just didn’t click with me

Suite Française-Irène Némirovsky

This one sounds like it would be right up my alley. A book set in wartime, by a person who had actually lived it. Loads of people seem to have loved it, so it isn’t completely abandoned yet but it’s been sitting on my shelves waiting for me to pick it back up for years. When I did first try to read it I found it just a bit too long for the story to get started


The Colour Of Magic- Terry Pratchett

I really loved Pratchett’s Johnny books, and I’ve tried a few of his discworld novels over time but only ‘Mort’ really clicked with me. I tried Colour of Magic most recently so that’s why I picked it for this list.

 

The Loney- Andrew Mitchell Hurley

This is so recently abandoned that it’s still sitting by my bed. I probably will pick it back up as mainly I stopped reading it because whenever I look at it I get this song (below) stuck in my head (yes even though it’s Loney not lonely). Yeah it was getting annoying so I made sure I put down the book facedown and then just sort of didn’t pick it up again…yet.

Oh no! Now it’s in my head again!

 

Have you seen my giveaway of the awesome book ‘Yes Means Yes’? Click here to enter.

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Sunday Surfing 3/9/17


bird surf
Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

How Book Lovers are Helping (and can help) Victims of Harvey 

A book of Fairytales Based on Notes From Mark Twain Are Being Published 

Stephen King has a Special ‘guilt table’ for Books He Needs to Comment on this is like the list of reviews to write waiting on my goodreads list…but to the extreme!

Usborne has Apologised for a Puberty Book Which Says Girls Grow Breasts ‘to make the girl look grown-up and attractive’   I just wonder why it’s taken 4 years for anyone to notice?

WW2 Fiction Released This Year we know I love books based during wartime, can anyone recommend any of these?

Terry Pratchett’s Unfinished Novels have Been Steamrolled I agree with Pratchett’s wishes here, it always makes me a bit uncomfortable when novels are finished and released posthumously

Early Mobile Libraries this sounds awesome, almost wish it still existed in the same form

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

Nut Free Nerd’s review of ‘The Road’ made me want to read a book I’ve known a little about for a long time.

Literary Lindsey’s Review of ‘My Glory Was I Had Such Friends’ made me already start to feel the emotions I thought the book would rise in me (Lindsey seems to be becoming a bit of a fixture in this section!)

Bookishly Boisterous’ Reflections on Being a Nerd which will resonate with many in the bookish community, and which I tried to comment on only for blogger to completely eat my comment 😦

I’ve started following new to me blogs Feminism in Cold Storage and Book Chatter

And on the blog this week…

‘Children’s Hour’ is back and we read ‘Sometimes I Feel Sunny’

I reviewed ‘Yes Means Yes’  and I’m giving away a copy at the end of the review

Top Ten Lesser Known War Novels

 

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Children’s Hour: Sometimes I Feel Sunny


It’s been so long since I last did a Children’s Hour that apparently photobucket won’t let me use my graphic anymore 😦 Hopefully I’ll be able to get back on schedule now I’m back at work, and I’ll try to sort a graphic for next week

Children’s Hour is a  feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

One of my colleagues bought Sometimes I feel Sunny for the toddlers (who I now work with again) to cover an emotions topic with them it’s been the book I’ve found them most engaged with as a group since I moved in there. The toddlers are all usually 2 but we have quite a few who just moved up from baby room and aren’t quite 2 yet.

I think the book was pretty well aimed for the age group. The pictures are bold and simple, and the colours do a good job of showing how the different emotions feel which may be more accessible to those who don’t have the language to express how they feel yet. Plus the expressions on the faces are simple without being unrecognisable as those emotions (as I often find with simple pictures to show emotion).

The words are quite simple too with a repeating phase of “Sometimes I feel…(emotion)” and an example with the illustrative picture.

Whether it’s actually helping the kids understand their emotions is hard to tell, but at least they enjoy it and stay engaged!

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

Kindle (£4.99)

 

If you haven’t already head over to my review of ‘Yes Means Yes‘ for a chance to win a copy

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Top 10 Tuesday: Lesser Known War Books


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday which means it’s time for ‘Top Ten Tuesday’ from  The Broke and the Bookish is back today, this week is about lesser known genre books

I’m not really a genre reader, but I do read a lot of books set during war time so I decided to do Top 10 Lesser Known War Books.

As always, in no particular order and links are to my own reviews

Pegasus Falling- William E. Thomas

‘Pegasus Falling’ is an indie story written with Thomas’ own memories of fighting in WW2 as part of a parachute regiment, and including elements of stories about prisoners of war and those who spent time in concentration camps. ‘Pegasus Falling’ is the first in a series which continues with ‘It Never Was You’

The Shouting Wind- Linda Newberry

‘The Shouting Wind’ is a story of a woman who joins the WAAF during WW2. It was one of my favourite books as a teenager.

A Little Love Song- Michelle Magorian

Michelle Mogorian is better known as the author of ‘Goodnight Mister Tom’ (another good war novel) but ‘A Little Love Song’ is more grown-up. It is about a teenager who moves to the country during WW2 and falls in love. It’s probably more of a love story than a war story but some of the issues in it are to do with the war

The Almond Tree- Michelle Cohen Corasanti

‘The Almond Tree’ is an indie novel and is honestly one of the best war novels I’ve read. It takes part in occupied Israel and concerns the Israel-Palestine conflict. It follows a boy living in the area whose Father is arrested and has to become the man of the house overnight


Kommandant’s Girl- Pam Jenoff

Pam Jenoff is quite well known in some circles, and Kommandant’s Girl is probably her most famous, but I don’t think I’ve seen it reviewed on any other blogs. I was umming and ahhing over whether to include it. I decided to because it is marketed more as a romance book than a war book (which I disagree with). It’s about a woman in the resistance who has a mission which involves creating a relationship with a German Kommandant.


Remembrance- Theresa Breslin

Remembrance is about a woman who becomes a nurse during WW1


Goodbye Marianne- Irene N. Watts

‘Goodbye Marianne’ is the story of a Jew growing up in Nazi Germany and how she escapes on the Kindertransport. The Kindertransport is reason for the title, but it’s not the part of the book I remember the most

I didn’t quite make it to 10 this time (so many war books are well known!) but you can see more of my war book recommendations here

I’m always looking for new war books, any to recommend?

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SuMonday Surfing 28/8/17


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SuMonday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

This weekend I was ill and staying at my Dad’s (I’m still ill but back home) so I decided rather than taking my computer with me I would just postpone a day.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Looks Like this Book Bought its Way on to the ‘New York Times’ Bestseller List

Books in Happy Meals Are Back (if you’re in the US)

The Estate that Inspired ‘The Great Gatsby’ is up for Sale (read my review of Gatsby)

The Most Reviewed Books on Amazon I’ve read a fair few of these, which have you read?

10 Literary Blogs to Read I was hoping more of these would be blogs which are just blogs rather than blogs of bigger companies, but they’re still worth having a look at

 

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

A Mass Subscription Unboxing on ‘Curiosity Killed The Bookworm’ I’ve been vaguely thinking about getting a subscription box, this is good to see what sort of things a few boxes provide

Literary Lindsey’s Review of ‘Word For Word’ made me want to read it despite it not being exactly what I thought it would be

I’ve been looking at booktube a bit recently. It seems a bit YA based for my tastes but ‘Tomes with Tea‘ recommended this vlogger ‘Mercy’s Bookish Musings’ who seems to have fairly similar taste to me. The first video of hers I watched is at the bottom of the post

And on the blog this week…

Top 10  Important Books for Teenagers

I Asked What You Would Like to See a Review of

 

 

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Top 10 Tuesday: Important Books for Teens


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday which means it’s time for ‘Top Ten Tuesday’ from  The Broke and the Bookish is back today, this week is a ‘back to school’ freebit

When I went to my most recent bookclub meet-up one of the women there said she wanted to give the book we were reading (The Power) to the first teenage girl she saw, so I decided to do Top 10 Important Books For Teens, these books are books which would teach a lesson, but hopefully in a fun way. They are not all designed for teenagers, but I think they would generally be appropriate. I also tried to pick books which would appeal to a wide range of teenagers not just ones with certain issues

As always, in no particular order

How to Build a Girl- Caitlin Moran

This one for teenage girls (most of them probably are as I was one once). It’s a bit like How to be a Woman but in fiction form. So a good feminist novel which teaches things you might not learn in school. I would probably like to introduce girls to How to be a Woman too, but this is probably more accessible.

Eleanor & Park- Rainbow Rowell

It’s a fairly decent representation of a relationship, not perfect and about accepting people for who they are, and thinking of others before yourself

The Storyteller- Jodi Picoult

A good one to learn about the holocaust, but also about forgiveness and remorse, and how it still has an impact on people today.

Look Who’s Back- Timur Vermes

A comic story, but with a serious message about how history can repeat itself, probably best read after learning about Hitler

 

Animal- Sara Pascoe

Teaches about feminism and sex ed in a way that school won’t and contains some really important information. As soon as I read this I wanted to share it with every teenage girl


Furiously Happy- Jenny Lawson

A somewhat comic look at depression which is good for showing that mental health is important and should be talked about


The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants (Summers of the Sisterhood)- Ann Brashares

The first one on my list that I read as a teenager. About the importance of friends, and growing up. When I read it there was only one book in the series but I did read the second (and I think the third too). The first is probably the best but there is a lot of important emotional stuff in the second.

Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret- Judy Blume

I think Judy Blume’s teenage books are pretty much essential reading for teenage girls. Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret is probably the best place to start. The issues are fairly ordinary issues for most teenage girls and deal with becoming a woman.


Anything by Paula Danziger

Like Judy Blume Paula Danziger writes about typical teenage issues. If amazon is anything to go by not many of her books are still being published which is sad, they were one of my teenage staples. The photo is one of the few I could find new from amazon, and it’s aimed at boys(!)

Angus, Thongs and Full-frontal Snogging- Louise Rennison

Another typical teenager book, but one which is set in the UK. Not always the most serious of topics but it is good in terms of talking about independence and dating

Special mentions: The Girl’s Series- Jacqueline Wilson, Speak- Laurie Halse Anderson, Noughts and Crosses- Malorie Blackman

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Sunday Surfing 20/8/17


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Waterstones and Richard Osman are Looking For Nominations of ‘The Best Book Ever’

Is The Booker Prize bad for authors?

New Merriam-Webster Feature Allows You to Find Out Words Which Were First Coined in a Particular Year. In My birth year some interesting ones were GIF, emoticon and techno which I thought would be later than 1987

Are Fears of Triggering Causing More Books to be Banned?

A Novelist Who Wanted to Write a Book About a Novelist Who Committed Murder has Been Arrested for Murder and it seems she did it.

This Woman Gives Away Books From Her Shelves to Visitors. It seems like a nice idea, but I don’t think I could part with my books so easily

 

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

Literary Lindsey Wonders About the Importance of Understanding What You Read

Top 10 Tuesday is Back on ‘The Broke and the Bookish I joined in (link below) but had trouble commenting on blogger blogs, ay other wordpress users had this issue this week?

And on the blog this week…

Top 10 Non-fiction Books

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Top 10 Tuesday: Non-Fiction


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

I realised a bit late that ‘Top Ten Tuesday’ from  The Broke and the Bookish is back today, but it’s a freebie week so easy enough to join in with

As it’s a freebie week I’ve decided to do Top 10 Non-fiction books. I’ve been on a bit of a non-fiction kick lately so I’ve got plenty to choose from.

As always, in no particular order

The Etymologicon- Mark Forsyth

I mention Forsyth’s interesting and entertaining books about language frequently (and they have even featured on two previous Top 10 Tuesday posts). The Etymologicon is my favourite, but The Horologicon, and The Elements of Eloquence are also fantastic

Yes Means Yes- Jaclyn Friedman and Jessica Valenti

A series of essays about women’s sexuality, rape and feminism. Very thought provoking and because the essayists have different views it’s interesting to see how different people view feminism. I haven’t fully reviewed this one yet but I have written a series of posts about various essays. Not one for the faint hearted, but I think it’s an important book

How to Be a Woman- Caitlin Moran

Part autobiography, part feminist anthem. Caitlin Moran’s first book is one I recommend frequently, and one which left me wishing I could be her friend. A more accessible form of feminism than the more serious feminist tomes. I genuinely think this should be read by every teenage girl (I also think this of Animal, but I didn’t like that as much)

Do No Harm- Henry Marsh

An interesting personal look at neurosurgery and the NHS by neurosurgeon Henry Marsh. I found this to be a real page turner (or maybe button presser as I read it on kindle), and easy to understand as someone who knows relatively little about neurology (maybe a little more than others from my psychology degree). I even managed to read it when in hospital for surgery.



The Lucifer Effect- Phillip Zimbardo

This is a book that I think is really important, but it isn’t the easiest read- emotionally or in terms of readability. It’s Zimbardo’s own account of his famous prison experiment on authority. An experiment which had to be cancelled because it was going too far

The Complete Polysyllabic Spree- Nick Hornby

When I read Nick Hornby’s book about books I added so many books to my wishlist. It is a collection of his columns from The Believer, and is featured on The Rory List.

Dave Gorman’s Googlewhack Adventure- Dave Gorman

Dave Gorman’s second book is a part travel part comedy book. His journey starts with one googlewhack; a phrase which elicits only one response when searched on google. He contacts the owner of the site and visits them to ask them to find another googlewhack who he also visits and so on. It’s mainly funny but also interesting to see which websites he sees and where he goes.

How to be a Heroine- Samantha Ellis

In ‘How to Be a Heroine’ Ellis revisits books which have shaped her. Will she still have to same opinions or will something have changed? A perfect blend of bookishness and feminism.

 Living Dolls- Natasha Walter

Living Dolls is the book which introduced me to feminist non-fiction. It looks at how society is creating a new type of sexism which teaches girls that they have to be ‘girly’ and boys that they have to be ‘tough’.

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened- Jenny Lawson

Jenny Lawson talks about her life and depression with humour and honesty. A fun read with more meaning than it may originally seem.

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Sunday Surfing 13/8/17


I bet you thought I had forgotten this feature! Well it’s back, and a little changed.bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging, and from other blogs. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

The Boom of Female Stories

Love Stories Reimagined as Stephen King Books

A Different Way to Look at Mrs. Bennet. I find it hard not to imagine the BBC’s Mrs. Bennet, but actually this article really has her on the nose

Quentin Blake and Lauren Child in Conversation

The Ten Most Addicting Books I’ve somehow managed to read only 1 of these, which was good, but not addictive (also is addicting a word? Surely it should be addictive? WordPress doesn’t give it a red squiggle though)

!NEW! On other Blogs this Week

Heavenali reviewed ‘The Power’ (my own review is up and coming)

Greenish Bookshelf reviewed a long time favourite ‘The Book Thief’ (my review is here)

Read at Midnight’s Reading Quest looks like such good fun but I don’t think I have enough books that can be used for it.

And on the blog this week…

I reviewed ‘Animal’

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Readathon Closing Survey


Well, here we are, I finished! That was good fun, could have kept going though.

1. Which hour was most daunting for you?

Hour 10/11 somewhere between 11pm and midnight I started . getting a bit blurry eyed so took a break to look at twitter and the challenges, then had supper whilst reading and got some sleep. I guess my waking up hour was tough too, I spent about half an hour hitting snooze, that was 8:30am…not sure which hour
2. Could you list a few high-interest books that you think could keep a reader engaged for next year?

Armada when really well for me, I spent most of yesterday evening and some of this morning on that one. I did have in my head to read bits of Moranifesto in between because I could just read one essay to break things up, but I ended up not doing that.
3. Do you have any suggestions for how to improve the Read-a-thon next season?

Not really. I wouldn’t mind it being longer, but I suppose people who read the whole 24hrs wouldn’t agree with me there!
4. What do you think worked really well in this year’s Read-a-thon?

I liked the challenges, especially some of the more creative ones.
5. How many books did you read?

2 and a bit.
6. What were the names of the books you read?

Career of Evil- Robert Galbriath

Armada- Ernest Cline

and I started Cauldestone- Linda Gillard
7. Which book did you enjoy most?

Probably Armada
8. Which did you enjoy least?

errr…I guess Cauldstone because I didn’t finish
9. How likely are you to participate in the Read-a-thon again? What role would you be likely to take next time?

I really want to, but it depends, this time I had an excuse to do nothing.

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Readathon Opening Survey


18156250_1845241188837582_6675611227449692308_oEkkk I’m so excited it’s my first readathon!

You can find Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon here

1) What fine part of the world are you reading from today?

I’m in the UK, Birmingham, which means I’m starting at 13:00, I think that’s a good time to start!
2) Which book in your stack are you most looking forward to?

Most of my books are actually on my kindle, I loaded a load when I was going to hospital, most of which I didn’t read. I’m looking forward to finishing ‘Career of Evil’ which is my current major read. And I’m looking forward to ‘Moranifesto’.
3) Which snack are you most looking forward to?

I bought myself some chocolate cornflake cakes which I am really addicted to. Also we’re ordering in curry from my favourite Indian for dinner, not exactly a snack but still yumm!
4) Tell us a little something about yourself!

My name is Lucy, I’m 30. I’ve had this blog for almost 10 years but this is my first readathon, I’ve been wanting to join in for ages but the times have never matched up with my schedule. This time I’m on sick leave from work and pretty much not allowed to move from the sofa so it’s perfect.
5) If you participated in the last read-a-thon, what’s one thing you’ll do different today? If this is your first read-a-thon, what are you most looking forward to?

I’m really looking forward to the community spirit side of things, and also hopefully making a decent dent in my TBR pile

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Children’s Hour: Jack and the Beanstalk


Children’s Hour is a  feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.
A few months ago we got a forest school put into our nursery. The kids loved it, and still do, and we found it really sparked the imagination of some of the children. One of the children suggested that the posts for the hammocks (which we put up as an when) could be candles for a giant’s birthday cake, so that started us off on a whole topic about the giant who had visited our forest school. Of course we needed to find out more about giants so we read Jack and the Beanstalk.

I think there is a reason why some stories stay around for a long time, and the kids certainly enjoyed this one. They used what they had learnt from the book to facilitate their play, from hiding, to cutting down the big tree so that he would fall.

The edition which we have is a lift-the-flap book (it’s the same as the one shown and linked below) which is always something which helps to engage the kids because they love lifting the flaps. They asked to read it quite a few times after it had first been introduced, and a lot of them could tell parts of the story off by heart. We even had one parent coe in and tell us that their son had been talking about Jack and the Beanstalk at home- which is really lovely to hear.

Buy it:

Paperback (£5.99)

Paperback with CD (£7.99)

Kindle (£2.69)

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What I’m Reading Now


Hi, I’m back! Considering all the reading I’m going to be having the time to do, and that I’ve done already I thought I would do a sort of last, now and next post.

I’ve also linked this post up with ‘It’s Monday, What Are You Reading?’

I have just finished…

‘Small Great Things’- Jodi Picoult

I got a surprisingly good deal on the hardback of this, it was actually cheaper than the paperback. It’s the usual Jodi Picoult moral dilemma story. This time a black nurse is accused of being the cause of the death of the child of a white supremacist. I thought the voice of the white supremacist was surprisingly easy to emphasise with, but it’s difficult to judge how well her voice of a black woman came across. Full review to        follow

I am currently reading…

Do No Harm- Henry Marsh

Because I am insane I decided to start reading this memoir of a neurosurgeon about a week before I went into hospital. Whilst there I put it on a break (although I was still reading it the day before my surgery). I am finding it really interesting, and readable, and I’m almost done with it now. I got a good deal on this one too.

All the Light We Cannot See- Anthony Doeer

This one has been on my TBR pile since Christmas. I only started it today so I have no real opinion yet but I’ve heard great things, and it’s a novel set during wartime which I tend to enjoy.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone- J.K. Rowling

I brought this one into the hospital mainly as a comfort read, and actually didn’t read much of it in the end (I have been tending to watch The Gilmore Girls as a comfort thing instead which takes even less concentration). I may still read it but it’s looking pretty unlikely. (link is to another edition)

Up next…

Nasty Women- Various

I got this series of essays about being a woman in the 21st century from netgalley. Once I’m done with ‘Do no Harm’ it’s going to be the next read on my kindle

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Children’s Hour: The Lion Inside


Children’s Hour is a  feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

I bought The Lion Inside for the kids when I got a new copy of Bear Hunt for our workshop, because it was on the same offer. At the moment we have a group of kids who re really rowdy, and some of them find storytime/carpet time really difficult to sit through and listen during, so I was looking for a book which would engage them (because I know they can be engaged). The Lion Inside did a pretty good job; if anything too good a job because rather than jumping up to mess around or turning and poking their friends they were jumping up to look at the pictures or ask questions (which is a good reason to jump up, just makes it difficult for the other kids).

The story is about a mouse who wants to make friends and be noticed, but is too small and too quiet, so she decides to ask the loud, popular, lion to . teach her how to roar. It’s a nice story about friendship, and being brave, and about judging others. I was hoping it would teach that you don’t have to be loud to be noticed- I’m not sure that quite got through though!

The pictures are beautiful, I especially like the image below, where the lion looks big and scary- although you soon find that he is not what you expect!

There was one line in the book which almost stopped me from buying it “If you want to change, you first have to change you”, it sort of suggests that you should change for others, although it’s later shown not to be true. I’m not sure the kids got this subtlety, although one asked about the line so I could explain it anyway!

Buy it:

Paperback (£3.85)

Kindle (£3.99)

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Children’s Hour: Our Bear Hunt Workshop *Special*


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog on Thursdays where I look at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

I currently work with the pre-schoolers (aged 3-4) so most of my readings are to them.

This week I am not talking about a book as such, but about an afternoon we had based around our favourite book We’re Going on a Bear Hunt.

One of our parents had suggested a story hour as a workshop idea as her kid loves stories, but most of our kids couldn’t sit and listen to stories for that long! So I decided to do a story based workshop instead, based around Bear Hunt.

We started off reading the story together, and it was really nice to have the children and the parents joining in. Then we had a talk about how the bear felt (sad, because he wanted to be friends) before doing some bear hunt related activities. (unfortunately child protection means I can’t put any photos).

We had planting seeds, for the grass. This was popular but most of the kids were more interested in just chucking all the dirt in the pots, and one of the kids put soil in the water, which meant we then couldn’t use the water for the river.

For the snow storm we had some coloured ice with things frozen in it. The girls especially seemed to like this one, one of the girls actually stayed doing it for a whole hour! This might have been because of the gems hidden in one of the ice pieces. The boys became more interested about it when they saw that there was a tiger in some of the ice!

For the forest we had painting with sticks, this didn’t seem that popular, which sort of surprised me, but one kid did lots of pictures and said he prefered painting with sticks over brushes.

The ‘mud’ was very popular, but also very messy! We had making muddy footprints with brown paint. Part of the mess issue with this is that the kids who didn’t have parents there were sort of taking over and it . was something that needed supervision.

Probably the most popular bit though was the cave and the bears. I put this in our forest school area, making a covered ‘cave’ area, hiding bears and leaving torches. The idea was for the kids to see how many bears that they could find, but to be honest they were more interested in just using the torches.

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Top 10 Tuesday: 10 Books Santa Should Leave Under my Tree


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s 10 Books Santa (or Father Christmas if I’m being English) should leave under my tree. My wishlist is over 180 items long, most of them are book, because every time I see a book I want to read I add it to my list, but then when I’m shopping I see other books I want, so I only tend to get books from my list as presents. Some things have been on there a long time, the oldest item was added in 2006, the oldest book in 2009. So my problem isn’t pickig 10 things but narrowing it down to 10!

As always in o particular order

1) Where My Heart Used to Beat- Sebastian Faulks

I have been a bit disappointed by the last few Sebastian Faulks novels, but I also have loved past novels, so I shall keep going, this one sounds like it will be a good ‘un.

A man looking back on his life which includes some of the biggest events of the 20th century

 

 

2) Yes Means Yes- Jaclyn Friedman and Jessica Valenti

Maybe not really a present book, but one I am really interested in all the same.

It’s about approaches to women’s sexuality and rape. How approach to a woman’s sexuality leads to the type of victim blaming which is often seen in rape cases, and how things need to change.

 

3) Moranifesto- Caitlin Moran

What can I say, I love Caitlin Moran. Another collection of her columns, and a few unique to the book pieces.


 

 

4) The Lake House- Kate Morton

Another favourite author. I’ve loved everything my Kate Morton. With all the usual intrigue, a missing person, an abandoned house, and an old woman with secrets The Lake House promises to be no different.



5) Career of Evil- Robert Galbraith

 I have somehow yet to get my hands on this third Cormoran Strike book.

 

 

6) Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki And His Years of Pilgrimage- Haruki Murakami

 

It’s been too long since I read any Murakami (I read Sputnik Sweetheart a few months ago) and I really like the sound of this one. Tsukuru had four best friends in school, but one day they decide they don’t want to be his friends anymore. Since then Tsukuru has been adrift.

7) Migraine- Oliver Saks

 A psychology one, always high on my non-fiction lists. This one is about migraine, and manly interests me because I get the

8) The Closed Circle- Jonathan Coe

I mainly want this one because it’s a sequel to The Rotter’s Club. This time about the characters who were teenagers in The Rotter’s Club now living in the Britain of ‘New Labour’

9) A Recipe for Bees- Gail Anderson-Dargatz

I read A Cure for Death By Lightening a few years ago and really loved it. This book, by the same author is about a normal woman with gifts she can’t quite cope with. I very much doubt this will be under the tree, it doesn’t appear to be in print anymore

10) A new Kindle.

 

I haven’t even asked for this because I don’t know what kindle I want. I just know my current one is getting tired and I could really do with a new one before it completely conks out on me.

 

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Children’s Hour: Dinosaur Kisses


Children’s Hour is a new feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

It was quite a long time ago that I read Dinosaur Kisses to the pre-schoolers, in fact I think I originally chose it from the library for the toddlers. However I do remember that they found it funny. In it Dinah, the dinosaur wants to give everybody a kiss but keeps getting it wrong, she just has too many teeth for kissing!

It’s a cute little book, and Dinah is a loving character. The kids loved laughing at her getting the kissing wrong, and they described what she was doing instead. Some of the reviewers on amazon seem to think that their kids would learn to bite instead of kiss because of it, which seems strange to me, but maybe for some kids if it’s not explained.

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

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Children’s Hour: Banana (revisited)


Children’s Hour is a new feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

When I first reviewed Banana I wasn’t the one reading it, and to be honest I don’t think my co-worker quite ‘got’ it. It wasn’t so popular with the toddlers. The pre-schoolers though wanted it again- straight away. (I am just going to say it was my reading 😉 ). The book only has two words, banana and please, really the story is in the tone of voice, and the pictures. Maybe that’s part of what made it better for the pre-schoolers, that they could recognise the emotions in the pictures more easily than the toddlers, and I, of course asked them how the monkey felt.

If you’re a bit theatrical it’s a great book to read, but if you’re more about reading what’s written I’d leave it.

 

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

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Children’s Hour: Stick Man


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

Stick Man is a favourite for our pre-schoolers at the moment (we got this, Zog, A Squash and a Squeeze and Monkey Puzzle recently and Stick Man is the favourite). It’s about a stick man who keeps getting mistaken for a normal stick, with worse and worse consequences. It has Santa in it, so you could get away with using it as a Christmas book, but he’s barely in it, and Christmas is only in it a little too so it doesn’t have to be a Christmas book.

As with all Julia Donaldson books it has that tried and tested formula, rhyme and repetition, helped along by Axel Scheffler’s lovely illustrations.

It makes it easy to follow for the kids. They love joining i with “I’m Stick man, I’m Stick Man, I”M STICK MAN, that’s me”, and enjoying seeing the adults shouting and being silly too.

It’s on 3 for £10 on amazon at the moment too

Buy it:

Paoerback (£3.85)

Boardbook (£4.79)

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Children’s Hour: Help! The Wolf is Coming


Children’s Hour is a new feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
Our Pre-schoolers really enjoyed Help! The Wolf is Coming. It’s maybe a little simple for pre-schoolers but it is fun. There’s not really that much of a plot, just the wold chasing the reader through the pages. With each turn of the page you try to do something different to get rid of him, which includes turning and shaking the book, that’s what makes it so much fun!

It’s good for teaching position words too, and the pictures are great

Buy it:

 Board Book (£6.99)

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Top 10 Tuesday: Books to Sink Into


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s freebie week so I’ve decided to do Ten Books to Sink Into. That is books which swallow you up. Books you can’t put down. Books you read above other things (which for me would be netflix, Hearthstone, and getting off the bus at the right stop!) .Books where you have to read ‘just one more chapter’. Books you don’t want to end.

They might not be literary greats. They are rarely growers (although a grower may become a book to sink into, it’s not a complete book to sink into). They may not even be books you remember, but they are books that at the time really hooked you

The Shell Collector- Hugh Howey

I finished this one yesterday, and considering how my reading has been of late I read it really quickly. It’s an easy read but involving. It is about a journalist who is writing an expose on a family of oil tycoons who she blames for wreaking the world.

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns)- Mindy Kaling

I had to watch the American version of the office after reading Mindy’s first autobiography just so I wouldn’t loose her. Why isn’t The Mindy Project back yet?

Fangirl- Rainbow Rowell

I have a history of reading Rainbow Rowell on the bus and then sitting at the bus stop because I have to finish the last little bit (it happened with Landline too). This one about a fanfiction writer and her twin starting university is my favourite though

The Rosie Project- Graeme Simison

This funny and quirky book really drew me in. It’s about a man, Don who is trying to find the perfect women, although going about it in maybe too much of a scientific manner. I’ve recently read the sequel, The Rosie Effect which I enjoyed but didn’t quite have the same hook

Charlotte Street- Danny Wallace

I remember little real content of this book, other than that it was a sort-of romance and involved a lost camera. I do remember that it left me buzzing though, and that I devoured it

Handle With Care- Jodi Picoult

I pretty much devour any Picoult, but this is my favourite. About a mother suing her midwife who missed a birth defect in her daughter.

Captain Corelli’s Mandolin- Louis de Bernieres

Although as a whole I preferred The War of Don Emmanuel’s Nether Parts to de Bernieres more well known novel, Captain Corelli’s was more compelling to read (if you ignore the first chapter). It tells the story of an Italian army captain billeted to a Greek island during WW2 and how he falls in love with a woman who should be his enemy.

Harry Potter Series- J.K. Rowling

Well if you’ve been a visitor for a while you probably know how much of a Potter nut I am

Shades of Grey- Jasper Fforde

There is meant to be a sequel to this fantastic dystopian book book coming out, but will Fforde ever finish it (George R,R Martin fans may think they have it bad but I’ve been waiting  almost a decade for the next Shades of Grey book)

Texts From Jane Eyre- Mallory Ortberg

This funny little book of texts literary characters and authors might write is great for flicking through and quickly digestible.

 

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Top 10 Books Set in War Time


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s Top 10 Books set for… my old post on books set in wartime has been one of the most popular in the lifetime of my blog, so I’ve decided to update it. Some of the books are the same, some have changed.

Links lead to reviews, pictures lead to amazon. In no particular order.
When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, Judith Kerr, book, book cover

1) When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit- Judith Kerr is a semi-autobiographical book which features a Jewish family fleeing from Nazi Germany. It’s one of the first World War novels I can remember reading, although I read a lot around the same time (most notably Carrie’s War, Goodbye Marriane, Goodnight Mister Tom, The Peppermint Pig), and it’s the first of a series of three books.

 

Regeneration, Pat Barker, book, book cover

 

2) Regeneration- Pat Baker Pat Baker has written a fair few war novels (I’ve reviewed Double Vision on the blog, which is more modern) but the Regeneration trilogy is by far her best (of what I’ve read, anyway). It is set in a hospital where shell-shock victims are treated, with the aim of sending them back to the trenches

 

Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks, book, book cover
3) Birdsong- Sebastian Faulks this love and war story was a favourite of mine for a long time.

 

 

 

The shouting wind, linda newbery, book, book cover
4) The Shouting Wind- Linda Newbery, a favourite of mine as a teenager. All about a girl working for the RAF (as a sort of air controller) during WW2 who falls in love with one of the pilots. It’s the first of a series which follows three generations of a family, but it’s the best.

 

5) A God in Ruins- Kate Atkinson follows the life of Teddy, a significant part of which includes him being in the RAF. Very emotive.

 

 

 

Hotel on the corner of bitter and sweet, Jamie Ford, book, book cover
6) Hotel at the Corner of Bitter and Sweet- Jamie Ford tells the story of a Chinese boy, with a Japanese best friend who lives in America during the time of Pearl Harbour. It’s a side of the war which is more rarely covered. When I wrote the original version of this post I said that this was one of the best books set during wartime which I’d read recently, it still remains a firm favourite

 

Sarah's Key, Tatiana de Rosnay, book, book cover

7) Sarah’s Key- Tatiana de Rosnay As with The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, Sarah’s Key is based on a less covered side of the war. This time in occupied Paris, and with rounding up of Jews there. It is heart wrenching. Since writing the original version of this post I think I’ve come to appreciate Sarah’s key more, certainly parts of it stick rather significantly in my memory.

 

 

Remembrance, Teresa Breslin, book, book cover
8) Remembrance- Teresa Breslin another book I read as a teenager, and it remains one of the best war novels I’ve read. Follows five young people through WW1, the most memorable scenes for me were with the young woman who became a nurse.

 

 


9) The Book Thief- Markus Zusak sad bit also beautiful story of a girl living in Germany during WW2. The story is narrated by death and includes a hidden Jewish man amongst other things. The film is well worth watching too

the almond tree, book, book cover

10) The Almond Tree- Michelle Cohen Corasanti the only one on my list which is not set during the world wars. This one is about the Israel/Palestine conflict, and it’s my recommendation of the moment.

Special mentions:Pegasus Falling: indie book about a paratrooper who ends up in a concentration camp, and his life afterwards.

Gone With the Wind: not strictly a war book, although it does feature the war of independence.

– Captain Correli’s Mandolin: More of a love story set during the war really.

The Kommandant’s Girl: about a Jewish woman in Poland during Nazi occupation who is hidden in plain sight and become the girlfriend of a Nzi Kommandant to help the resistance.

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Sunday Surfing 13/3/16


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

The Booker Prize Longlist has Been Revealed

This Young Gil Opened a Library in the Slums

Men Give Up on Books Quicker Than Women Do

And on the blog this week…

 

I reviewed ‘The Radleys’

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Sunday Surfing 6/3/16


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

Writer Louise Renson has Passed Away. I remember reading the Georgia Nicholson books as a teenager.

Axel Scheffler has Said There Would Have Been ‘No Gruffalo Without (the) EU’

 

Beatrix Potter’s Lost Book is Being Released. This is the Cover

Le Prix de la Page’ Literary Prize Picks books by Reading Just to Page 112

Reasons to be Proud of Being a Book Horder

The Library is Allowing People to Donate Food in Lieu of Fines

Writers With Strange Deaths

And on the blog this week…

Lots of great kindle deals this month

 

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Sunday Surfing 29/2/16


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Apparently I haven’t posted a Sunday Surfing for six months (thanks for that jolt of reality wordpress) so I’m posting some older links too.

Around the web this week

 

This bookshop is giving a discount to people who ‘open carry’ guns

The most borrowed library books in the UK

Reading for pleasure could make you happier

Popular names invented by authors -I don’t get the whole call it a baby name thing, it’s not like we shed names as we grow up)

Simon and Schuster are releasing an imprint for Muslim children’s books -don’t really get why it needs a separate imprint but it’s good that they are trying to get more books with non-white children.

Bones of woman who inspired ‘Tess of the d’Urbervilles’ may have been found

 

And on the blog this week…

I talked about the ballet of Raven Girl

I reviewed Why Not Me?

 

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Top 10 Tuesday: Toddler’s Top 10 Books


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

 

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s a free choice so I decided to do The Toddler’s Top 10 Books. That is books which the toddlers that I’ve worked with over the years have loved. I started working with the pre-schoolers a couple of weeks ago so I thought this would be a nice way to close that period of time.

In no particular order.

I’m Not Cute- Jonathan Allen

I’m Not Cute is about Baby Owl who everyone thinks is cute, but he says he isn’t. It’s consistently popular with the toddlers, even as the groups change. We also love ‘I’m not Reading’ and ‘I’m Not Sleepy’ which are about Baby Owl

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt- Michael Rosen

A sort of modern classic. A poem in essence about going on a bear hunt and the obstacles encountered

 

Cock-a-Moo-Moo- Juliet Dallas-Conte

Another that has been popular with different groups. A funny little story about a cockerel who forgets how to crow.

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

This one has been popular for a long time, and it’s popular with the babies too. Very simple. Each animal being asked what they see. The kids can ‘read’ it to themselves. Special mention to ‘Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?’ which is similar but about sounds and the kids also love.

Shh! We Have a Plan- Chris Haughton

This one is a current favourite, the kids ask for ‘The blue book’. It’s about some men trying to catch a bird. The pictures are key

Don’t Wake the Bear, Hare!

This is an old favourite, but stayed popular for a long time. The animals are having a party, bt they don’t want to wake the sleeping bear.

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Monkey Puzzle- Julia Donaldson

A personal favourite. About a monkey trying to find his Mum. Of course Julia Donaldson is basically queen of picture books.

The Animal Boogie- Debbie Harter

A favourite singing book. Complete with CD. Special mention for ‘Walking Through the Jungle’ another song book we’ve loved

Some Dogs Do- Jez Alborough

About a year ago the kids always asked for this book which is about a dog who finds he can fly. I really disliked it.


Painter Bear- Vivianne French

The kids loved the way my collegue used to read this story- telling painter bear off.

What books do you like to read to your kids? Or which picture books did you like growing up

 

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Children’s Hour: The Time it Took Tom


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
The Time it Took Tom has been fairly popular with the toddlers, and more popular with the pre-schoolers.

In the story Tom finds a tin of paint, and decides to paint to living room…completely! The story talks about the time it took, and the time the events after took.

The toddlers like the simpler parts of the story as Tom is actually painting, but they tend to loose interest in the longer bits that describe how they fixed it. It’s a good book to talk about time, and there is a lot of extra story in the pictures as you see Tom’s Mum out of the window.

The pictures are by Nick Sharratt and of the style which tends to be popular with kids

Buy it:

Paperback- new or used (from £3.40)

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Sunday Surfing 6/9/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

A Group of Authors Are Raising Money for Syria. Different authors are matching £10,000 each, as I type they’ve raised over £860,000 you can donate here

Books to Read if You Love Haruki Murakami

How Books Changed This Prisoner’s Life

How Reading Books is Better to Reading e-books

Bookish Sand Sculptures

Why Books Are Dangerous

It’s been a while since I’ve put a video in here but I couldn’t resist this little bookworm

 

And on the blog this week…

 

Blogiversary Giveaway

I Reviewed ‘Hallucinations’

The Kids Read ‘Dinosaur Kisses’

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Children’s Hour: Dinosaur Kisses


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
I’ve read Dinosaur Kisses to both toddlers and pre-school, but it went down better with the younger ones.

The story is about a dinosaur who sees a kiss and wants to copy, but keeps getting it wrong.

It’s very simple, probably too simple for a pre-schoolers, at least I think that’s why they appreciated it less. The toddlers though liked all the noises included in the narrative, and found it funny when the dinosaur got it wrong.

Personally I liked the pictures which were very cute. and I had imagined it as being more a book for the toddlers than the pre-schoolers.

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

Hardback (£11.99)

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Sunday Surfing 30/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Which YA Book to Read Based on Your Favourite Disney Princess

The Benefits of Reading Before Bed

A Japanese Bookseller Bought Most of the Copies of Murukami’s Latest Book to Hold Off The Online Sellers

The Best Selling e-books of 2015 (so far)

‘American Gods’ is Being Adapted For TV

Oliver Sacks, Neuropsychologist and Writer Has Died

And on the blog this week…

Food in Literature 101

The Kids Read ‘I’m Not Sleepy’

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Children’s Hour: I’m Not Sleepy


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
I’m Not Sleepy is another story about our favourite Baby Owl. I borrowed it from the library because the toddlers love Baby Owl

In this one it’s Baby Owl’s bedtime, but he doesn’t want to go to sleep because

“I’m NOT sleepy”

even though he’s yawning, and stretching, and even closing his eyes.

It’s much more like ‘I’m Not Cute‘ than ‘I’m Not Reading‘, which I prefer as a it’s a bit simpler and easier to follow, plus there’s much more of Baby Owl shouting, which we all like.

There are different animals to the animals in ‘I’m Not Cute’ which is interesting for the kids, and as with ‘I’m Not Cute’ the kids love naming the animals, as well as joining in with the shouting.

It’s probably our second favourite library book, after ‘Shh! We Have a Plan

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

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Top 10 Tuesday: Food in Literature 101


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s Top Ten Books That Would Be On Your Syllabus If You Taught X 101 .

Welcome to Food in Literature 101. In this course we will be looking at books and scenes in books where food is important. Eating in this class is not only allowed but encouraged. This is your required reading:

Chocolat- Joanne Harris

The descriptions of chocolate in this book are graphic enough to mean you need a bar of chocolate to hand when reading it

Great Expectations- Charles Dickens

Specifically the scene where Pip meets Miss Havisham in her decaying wedding reception.

 

A Little Princes- Frances Hodgeson Burnett

Again specifically the scene where Sara and Becky are really hungry so they imagine a magnificent feast.


The Book Unholy Mischief- Ellie Newmark

When a homeless boy is caught stealing a pomegranate by a chef the chef takes this as showing the superior taste of the boy so he takes him in to be a chef’s apprentice.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl

Food plays a role in a lot of Roald Dahl work (the cake in Matilda, the peach in James and the Giant Peach, for example), but Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has the most feed in it. For a more full look at food in Roald Dahl take my second year class.



Like Water For Chocolate- Laura Esquivel.

This book has recipes as part of the story.One at the begginning of each chapter

Brooklyn Bites Short Stories- Scott Stabile

These short stories have food as a pivotal part of the plot. Technically 3 books, but they’re all very short.

 

 

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Sunday Surfing 23/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

Run a Bookshop, as Your Holiday

Jonathan Franzen Considered Adopting an Iraqi Orphan so he Could Learn about Young People. I don’t even know where to start with this one

The Book that Claims it Can Put Your Child to Sleep

Why Bedtime Stories Are Good for Kids

Play the tumblr Book Themed Game

And on the blog this week…

I Talked About What is Happening With Libraries in Birmingham

The Kids Read ‘Shh! We Have a Plan’

 

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Children’s Hour: Shh! We Have a Plan (revisited)


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

I first wrote about Shh! We Have a Plan after I bought it for my nephew. When I saw it at the library a couple of weeks ago I decided I should share it at nursery too, especially considering how much they had loved Oh No, George! I think I made a pretty good choice because it’s almost certainly the toddler’s favourite book of the ones I got from the library (which is really saying something because one of them was a Baby Owl book).

Shh! We Have a Plan follows four men who are trying to catch a bird. Three of them are trying to use stealth and creeping up on the bird, the other is being very friendly, much to the annoyance of the other three

“Shh! SHH! We have a plan”

The kids like the simplicity of the words which make it very easy for them to join in, and they especially like saying

“Hello Birdy!”

along with the fourth man. They love looking out for the bird, and are becoming increasingly competent at describing what is happening in the pictures. Both make them feel a sense of achievement.

The pictures in the book tell as much of the story as the words do, which makes it almost like the children are making up the story for themselves. The pictures are simple but rather beautiful. I like how everything bar the birds are in blue which makes the bird stand out so you can see why the men want to capture it.

Buy it:

Paperback (£5.24)

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Sunday Surfing 16/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Mistakes You May Be Making When Reading 

Books in a Tweet, Do They Encourage Reading?

Why Paper Books Won’t Die (long but worth the read)

Why Mark Haddon Doesn’t Mind That ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime’ Has Been Censored

The Books Obama is Reading This Summer

Bad Things Are Happening to Libraries Here in Birmingham

Fake Books in Film

Are You Living in a Haruki Murakami Novel?

And on the blog this week…

Authors I’ve Read the Most Books From

The Kids Read ‘Ruby Roars’

 

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Children’s Hour: Ruby Roars


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
Last week I went to the library to pick some books for the kids (let’s not go any further into this library business here or I may start getting angry) Ruby Roars is one of the books I picked. I’ve been in pre-school a lot this week and they seem to have taken to Ruby Roars, which is strange because they didn’t seem that engaged when I read it first time, I suppose they must have been more interested that I thought though because they asked for it again.

Ruby Roars is about a Tasmanian devil who is learning how to roar. She tries out lots of different noises but can’t seem to scare anybody. Eventually she finds the perfect word and scares everybody.

The kids like the noises which increase in their volume (or at least they do when I read it!). They find it funny I think to see you being a bit silly (which is sort of strange because half my job is being silly, you’d think they would expect it by now). It was because of the noises that I picked the book out, so I’m glad I was right

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

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Top 10 Tuesday: Top Ten Authors I’ve Read The Most Books From


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s Top Ten Authors I’ve Read The Most Books From I’m using my Goodreads so not sure this is 100% correct, but more or less. Title links are for reviews. Most books read is first:

Enid Blyton

27 books read. It wasn’t until I started counting until I realised how many Enid Byton books I’ve read. All the Adventure series, all the Secret Seven, 1 Famous Five, 3 Twins at Saint Clare’s. Mostly borrowed from the library as a child. I feel  I should do better.

Jodi Picoult

25 books read. All her solo written books and kindle shorts except Wonder Woman and Leaving Home.

Jaqueline Wilson

21 books read. For a few years in junior school (and the beginning of secondary school) I read all of the Jaqueline Wlson books I could get my hands on. I may still have one somewhere, and I still want to call my child Lottie after The Lottie Project.

Roald Dahl

15 books read. Most of his children’s ones, as a child. I intend to try out his adult stories at some point


J.K. Rowling.

13 books read. All the Harry Potter’s plus Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Quidditch Through the Ages and Tales of Beedle the Bard. The Casual Vacancy and her books as Robert Galbraith.

Judy Blume

13 books read. A good chunk of her YA novels. I should really try one of her adult novels at some point.

Paula Danziger

13 books read. Around about the same time I was reading Judy Blume.

Noel Streatfeild.

13 books read. Again in childhood.

Jasper Fforde

10 books read. 7 Thursday Next, 2 Nursery Crimes, 1 Shades of Grey (when oh when will that second one come out!)He’s got a new one coming out next year too, a stand-alone novel, how exciting!

Charlaine Harris

19 books read. First 10 Sookie Stackhouse books. I was in a bookring on the Bookclub Forum, but it stopped at book 10 and I was never that bothered to seek out the last 3.

I think my list is pretty telling about how my reading habits have changed. When I was younger I used to find a book I liked then try and read everything by that author. Now I read more eclectically meaning that it’s only favourite authors who I keep returning too, or if I’m reading a series I will read a lot by one author

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday Surfing 9/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

A Night at the Harry Potter Hotel

Could You Answer Questions Asked of Booksellers?

This 7-year old Created a Comic About a Girl With Magic Afro Puffs

Which Margaret Atwood Should You Read?

What One Female Author Found When She Send Her Manuscript Under a Male Name

The First Books Authors Loved

Misconceptions About Harry Potter Fans

And on the blog this week…

Deals of the Moment

The Kids Read ‘Tip Tip, Dig Dig’

I Reviewed ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’

 

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Children’s Hour: Tip, Tip, Dig, Dig


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
The kids really liked Tip, Tip, Dig, Dig There’s a bit of a story to it, about how the different building equipment are going to fix problems but it’s more about the repeated refrains of what they do, e.g. tip, tip. The kids can join in and learn about what the different equipment does at the same time (which is good because everything is apparently a digger!). The problems are asked about so the kids can guess what the answers are too e.g. “Look at all this mess! What can we do with it?”

The pictures are very appealing, being bright and fairly simple.

Buy it:

Boardbook (£4.99)

Paperback (£10.19)

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Sunday Surfing 5/7/15


bird surf Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week. Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Books Children Should Read Before Finishing Primary School (according to teachers)

The Trailer For ‘Mockingjay Part 2’ is Out

And So is the Trailer for ‘Room

Picture Books Which Go Against Girlish Stereotypes

Read the First Chapter of ‘I Am Malala

The Man Booker Longlist was Revealed

And on the blog this week…

I Reviewed ‘Is Everybody Hanging Out Without Me?’

Lucybird’s Book Blog is now on tumblr

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Sunday Surfing 26/7/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

Most Popular Highlighted Quotes on Kindle (Excluding ‘The Hunger Games’)

The Moment Haruki Murakami Knew He Would Be a Writer

Can ‘Buzzfeed’ Guess How Old You Are Based on Your Taste in Books? Well it couldn’t with me…

There’s a Drop in Younger Children Visiting Libraries

And on the blog this week…

The Kids Read ‘One Bear At Bedtime’

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Children’s Hour: One Bear at Bedtime


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

One Bear at Bedtime is a simple story the boy only needs a bear to go to bed, but all these other animals show up. It’s a counting book, with a series of animals showing up, a different number of each.

The kids likes it because it was silly, with animals doing things they shouldn’t, like lions shampooing their manes. Really it’s the pictures which make the story- and the questions you ask.

 

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

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Sunday Surfing 19/7/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

Why ‘Clever Polly and the Stupid Wolf’ is Feminist.

Brain Scans May Indicate Which Children May Go on to Struggle With Reading

‘Go Set a Watchman’ Breaks First Day Sales Records

Is There a Third ‘Mockingbird’ Novel?

Should the Book World Fear Amazon?

Publishers Earn More than Authors on e-book sales

And on the blog this week…

 

I Reviewed ‘Stardust’

I Talked About the Last 10 Books I Aquired

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Top 10 Tuesday: Last 10 Books I Acquired.


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s The Last 10 Books I Acquired. I’m using my Goodreads so not sure this is 100% correct, but more or less. Title links are for reviews. Newest acquistion is first:

The Ocean at The End of the Lane- Neil Gaiman

This book which I bought on kindle was really cheap (I presume it still is, I bought it on the weekend). In it dark creatures are after our narrator, and he only has 3 women at the end of the lane to protect him.

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns)- Mindy Kaling

This one is in the kindle monthly deals. I’ve been wanting to read Mindy’s autobiographical book for ages, and I love her show The Mindy Project.

 

A Tale For the Time Being- Ruth Ozeki

Another kindle one which had been on my wishlist for a while. It’s the story of a diary which is found washed up on the beach. I wanted to start this the other day but found it had been sent to the cloud reader rather than direct to my kindle, gah.


Tigers in Red Weather- Lisa Klaussmann

This one was recommended to be by Rory, it was in the kindle’s monthly deals last month so I bought it (do I actually save any money on kindle monthly deals or end up spending more?). It tells the story of two cousins and a Summer which changes them. It’s my current kindle read.

A God in Ruins- Kate Atkinson

I actually bought this companion to ‘Life After Life’ in hardback, in a real shop. I’ve already read and reviewed it (see the link above), and I loved it.


Satan’s Shorts- Heide Goody and Iain Grant

This set of short stories was free on kindle. I hadn’t read it before as it was more a companion than part of the Clovenhoof series, but I heard it bridged some of the gaps between Pigeonwings and Godsquad

Stardust- Neil Gaiman

Another previous kindle monthly deal. I am in the middle of writing a review of Stardust as I’m writing this post (in fact I may end up publishing it before this as I’m preparing this on the Sunday). It’s the story of Tristan who goes into another land to find a fallen star.

The Apple- Michael Faber

The Apple is a series of short stories which link to The Crimson Petal and the White. Again a previous kindle monthly deal.

The Winter Guest- Pam Jenoff

You guessed it, another previous kindle monthly deal. This is about two sister’s living in Poland during WW2 one of whom finds and helps a crashed American paratrooper.

Ajax Penumbra: 1969

Another kindle book. This one is a prequel to Mr Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore and is all about Mr Penumbra before he became the owner of the store.

I sort of wish more of these were ‘real’ books. I suppose it’s easier to buy kindle books though, and I have a tendency to buy them when they’re cheap.

 

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