Category Archives: Chicklit

Vinegar Girl- Anne Tyler


Synopsis

Based on ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ ‘Vinegar Girl’ is the story of Kate Battista. After leaving university early Kate’s life ended up revolving around caring for her Father and sister, and a job she didn’t really like. She was stuck, then her father introduced her to his assistant Pyotr and seems strangely eager for them to have a relationship.

Review

I’ve never read or seen the original Shakespeare of ‘Taming of the Shrew‘, my main knowledge of it comes from the film ‘10 Things I Hate About You‘, so I knew somewhat what to expect, but knew the film wasn’t the same as the original play.

I’ve never read any Anne Tyler before, although I had heard of her and know she’s popular. I probably wouldn’t have read this one if I didn’t know it was a re-working of Shakespeare. It just sounded too chick-litty. I am not completely anti-chick-lit but I don’t tend to read it as it can be sort of formulaic, and that makes it predictable.

I probably would categorise it as chick-lit, if pushed, although the romance side is not as exaggerated as it would be in most chick-lit, and there was more of an emphasis on Kate as a person. I liked the emphasis on Kate, and I liked her as a character, but I would have liked more romance too, even if it made the book more stereotypically chick-lit. The romance element just seemed very sudden, especially if I compare it to ’10 Things I Hate About You’.

I enjoyed the book overall. It was an easy read, and engaging. I had been feeling that I didn’t really know what to read, it was a good gap filler. I’d like to read some of the others in the Hogarth Shakespeare series.

 3/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£5.58)

Kindle (£4.99)

Audiobook (free with an audible trial or £15.74)

Other Reviews:

Words for Worms

Sam Still Reading

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Filed under Chicklit, Classics, Contempory, Fiction review, Retelling

Landline- Rainbow Rowell


Disclaimer: I was given a copy of this book by the publisher (via netgalley) free of charge in exchange for an honest review

Synopsis (from amazon)

Georgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and he still loves her – but that almost seems besides the point now.Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells him that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her – he is always a little upset with her – but she doesn’t expect to him to pack up the kids and go home without her.When her husband and the kids leave for the airport, Georgie wonders if she’s finally done it. If she’s ruined everything.That night, Georgie discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past. It’s not time travel, not exactly, but she feels like she’s been given an opportunity to fix her marriage before it starts…

Is that what she’s supposed to do?

Or would Georgie and Neal be better off if their marriage never happened?

Review

I was all set to start my review with talking about how Landline is the best book by Rainbow Rowell that I’ve read so far. I even had to stay sitting at a bus top because I couldn’t walk home without finishing it. But today I finished Fangirl (the only book I hadn’t yet read by her), and Fangirl is just…better.

Landline was the best Rainbow Rowell book I’d read at the time, however, and I still think it was really good. It’s different to any of her others. It feels more adult than Attachments did. Maybe because Georgie is older, and Lincoln is basically a uni student stuck in a working person’s body (hey, aren’t we all a little like that?), maybe because Georgie has more of an ‘adult life’.

Landline is more instantly engaging than either Attachments or Eleanor & Park (or Fangirl actually, just Fangirl became like an addiction).

I expected the supernatural phone to the past to be a bit too far fetched, but somehow it worked. It seemed almost realistic. It felt more like a classic love story- or rediscovering love story. Plus it took some of the cuteness out of it, and sometimes love stories are too cute.

4/5

Buy it:

Independent via Hive:
Hardback (£8.77)

From Amazon:

Kindle (£4.99)

Hardback (£6.89)

Paperback- released March 2015 (£7.53)

Other reviews:

Curiosity Called the Bookworm

Words for Worms

Nylon Admiral

The Perpetual Page Turner

As the Crowe Flies (and Reads) (as part of month in review)

 

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Filed under Chicklit, Contempory, Fiction review, Romantic

Attachments- Rainbow Rowell



Synopsis (from amazon)

It’s 1999 and for the staff of one newspaper office, the internet is still a novelty. By day, two young women, Beth and Jennifer, spend their hours emailing each other, discussing in hilarious detail every aspect of their lives, from love troubles to family dramas. And by night, Lincoln, a shy, lonely IT guy spends his hours reading every exchange.

At first their emails offer a welcome diversion, but as Lincoln unwittingly becomes drawn into their lives, the more he reads, the more he finds himself falling for one of them. By the time Lincoln realizes just how head-over-heels he really is, it’s way too late to introduce himself. What would he say to her? ‘Hi, I’m the guy who reads your e-mails – and also, I think I love you’.

After a series of close encounters, Lincoln decides it’s time to muster the courage to follow his heart? And find out whether there really is such a thing as love before first-sight.

Review

Everybody seems to love Rainbow Rowell right now. I was intrigued to see what was so special about her. Even people who don’t normally review YA seemed to love her, so I thought there must be something. I went for Attachments because it’s her adult novel. I thought it would be  the most…sophisticated, I guess.

I did I suppose expect chick-lit, it sounds like chick-lit. It’s probably the category that Attachments most easily fits into. The style is a little different though. For one thing the main focus is probably Lincoln, where it would usually be a woman in chick-lit. There was a strong focus on Jennifer too, but maybe a little less than to Lincoln. We mainly saw her through her e-mails, we knew a little more about her than Lincoln did, but mainly we knew her as Lincoln did.

I’m not sure why more chick-lit isn’t written like this- with the reader seeing how the man thinks and feels. Surely he can be more attractive if you can see what he is really like? How much he loves his leading lady? With Lincoln it seems even better because he doesn’t know what Jennifer looks like. He falls in love with her personality, before he become physically attracted to her.

In terms of chick-lit it’s very good. Cute. You feel you really get to know the characters, you can see why Lincoln loves Jennifer, and you can love Lincoln himself. Plus there is a very everyday type feel to it. No real dramatic romantic moments, just real life. No perfect, a few pitfalls. Real.

I like the kindle cover, by the way, it’s like one of those magic eye pictures.

4/5

Buy it:
Paperback (£5.59)
Kindle (£3.99)

Other Reviews:

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Capitol Hell- Alicia M. Long and Jayne J. Jones


book, book cover, Capitol Hell, Alicia Long, Jayne Jones, Alicia M Long, Jayne J Jones, chick-lit
Disclaimer: This book was sent to me free of charge, by the author, in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis (from amazon)
When recent college graduate Allison Amundson, a small town girl from South Dakota, lands the highly sought-after job of scheduler to the newly-elected and rising star of the United States Senate, Senator Anders McDermott III, she initially thinks she is on the fast track to success. However, she quickly learns that crazy co-workers, a high maintenance boss, the boss’s over-the-top demanding family, and an unexpected Presidential bid make Capitol Hill seem even more dysfunctional than it looks on TV. In fact, it is Capitol Hell.

This off-beat, hilarious novel captures what it is like to work in the United States Senate. Find out how it feels to be a hot young staffer on Capitol Hill when you step into Allison’s hot pink high heels, and catch a glimpse of what life is really like ”inside the beltway.”

Review

The timing of this book being sent to me was pretty rather lucky for the authors. I don’t read chick-lit as a general rule, but I fancied something light, and had nothing on my to be read pile, so I decided I might as well try this one.

It’s been described as a political ‘The Devil Wears Prada‘, and I think that’s a pretty accurate description. In some ways it has more bite than The Devil Wears Prada because Allison actually wants to work in politics, it’s not just a means to an end for her. The things which are horrible about it don’t seem to be a ‘just for the time being’ thing. Having said that, maybe things are not quite as bad as they seem?

Long and Jones have both worked on Capitol Hill, so there is a certain element of truth to their story. Sometimes I was thinking to myself ‘I hope this isn’t based on a true story’ and at other times hoped that story events were based on true events.

For something with a political background Capitol Hell was surprisingly non-political. Political issues were covered, but there was little real opinion given, or when there was it was basic, no political arguments, more statements. In fact the thing in the book which made it most obvious that the authors had worked in the senate were the descriptions of the senate building.

I found Capitol Hell to be an amusing, light, and easy read. I liked Alison well enough, although I felt no particular attachment to her. It certainly served the purpose for me.

If you liked The Devil Wears Prada you probably will like Capitol Hell. And it lends itself to a sequel more than The Devil Wears Prada does (seriously I want to read Revenge Wears Prada just to see how a sequel is even possible!).

3/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£5.20)

Paperback (£10.24)

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Diary of a Jetsetting Call Girl- Tracy Quan


This book was read as part of the Wishlist Challenge.

Diary of a Jetsetting Call Girl is the third book in a series, it is preceded by Diary of a Manhattan Call Girl and Diary of a Married Call Girl.

Synopsis (from amazon)

Married call girl Nancy Chan has been asked to do something outrageous – even by her standards.

Most favoured customer Milt has invited Nancy to his luxurious new villa in idyllic Provence. That’s a lot of euros, but …

Can a (married) Manhattan call girl really holiday with a client? Seeing him morning, noon and night, coming up with new entertainments, and maintaining both a light tan and
a ‘professional’ distance? Not to mention Milt’s Viagra habit. In a difficult economic climate a girl can’t always meet her quota, and Nancy’s worried about losing her edge.

Nancy jumps at the chance to have a break from Manhattan (and from husband Matt) for a few weeks. Desperate for an alibi, she invents a vacation with her mom in southern France. In reality, Nancy is hard at work with some new playmates – Tini (Malaysian, with something extra), Isabel (a St-Tropez madam), and Serge (Isabel’s hunky chauffeur) – while Matt grows more inquisitive. As Nancy discovers, the French countryside is ‘ten times trickier than Manhattan’ and nothing in her temporary world is quite what it seems.

When Milt’s enigmatic cook Duncan turns up unexpectedly in Nancy’s erotic fantasies, she begins questioning everything she knows. Can Nancy keep getting away with this?

Review

Having read the first Nancy Chan novel as a teenager, and the second in 2009 I’ve had Diary of a Jetsetting Call Girl on my wishlist for quite some time. When I saw it in The Works I considered the Wishlist Challenge and thought, why not?

In comparison with the other Nancy Chan novels it was a bit racier than I had remembered. Obviously if it’s a book about a Call Girl you expect at least some sex but I’m sure there was less in the other books.

The plot was rather different from the other two as well. A bit less realistic, a few too many coincidences.

I did rather enjoy it however. It was an easy read, and had a bit more kick than your standard chick-lit.

3.5/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.89)

Kindle (£2.99)

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What Alice Forgot- Liane Moriarty


Synopsis (from Amazon)

Imagine losing the most important ten years of your life …

Alice is twenty-nine.She adores sleep, chocolate, and her ramshackle new house.She’s newly engaged to the wonderful Nick and is pregnant with her first baby.

There’s just one problem.All that was ten years ago …

Alice has slipped in a step-aerobics class, hit her head and lost a decade.Now she’s a grown-up, bossy mother of three in the middle of a nasty divorce and her beloved sister Elisabeth isn’t speaking to her.This is her life but not as she knows it.

Clearly Alice has made some terrible mistakes.Just how much can happen in a decade?

Can she ever get back to the woman she used to be?

Review

I’ve had What Alice forgot on my wishlist for quite a long time after seeing it on lots of blogs. So when it came up as the Kindle Daily Deal recently I snapped it up.

I wasn’t expecting some great life changing read, but I was expecting something quick and easy, with a decent amount of emotion- it seemed like the perfect book to read alongside The Virgin Suicides (which I will be reviewing later this week). In that sense I did get what I expected, but it was a bit more chick-litty than I expected. There was more of a love element than I had really expected, and whilst I liked Nick I didn’t think that would be what Alice would have been most focused on in real life.  After all she forgot her kids but still had to look after them! Surely that would be of more importance to her.

I did like the characters, especially Alice’s Great-Grandmother.

I would say this is an enjoyable read, but don’t go into it expecting a lot of substance.

3/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£3.99)

Paperback (£5.15)

Other Reviews:

DizzyC’s Little Book Blog

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Barefoot Girls- Tara McTiernan


Image from Amazon

Disclaimer: This book was sent to me free of charge in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis (from Amazon)

When her hometown newspaper reviews Hannah O’Brien’s newly released novel, the nature of her book is called into question when the reviewer suggests it is a memoir depicting her neglectful alcoholic mother – Keeley O’Brien Cohen, the most beloved of the Barefoot Girls – a little too accurately for fiction, citing rumors rather than sources.

Deeply hurt and betrayed, Keeley cuts Hannah out of her life. Desperate, Hannah does everything she can to apologize and explain, but her pleas fall on deaf ears. Meanwhile, the rest of Hannah’s life starts to unravel, pushing her to risk her engagement to Daniel, the one man who had been able to scale the high walls around her heart. At the eleventh hour, the Barefoot Girls are able to convince Keeley to send Hannah the keys to the Barefooter house, the home and heart of their friendship. Barred from their clubhouse since she was twelve, Hannah grabs the chance to visit the little shack filled with memories and perched at the tip of Captain’s Island in the Great South Bay on Long Island, New York.

As Hannah battles to come to terms with her equally blessed and troubled childhood and understand her mother and her sister-close friends, she’s confronted with the power of forgiveness and the dangers of holding on to the past.

Review

At first I was a little unsure about whether or not to accept this book is I’m completely honest. The author described Barefoot Girls as woman’s literature which pretty much sent off chick-lit sirens in my head. It’s not that I don’t like chick-lit exactly, but it does tend to be rather formulaic and predictable which does give a bit of a trashy air. I do read chick-lit but only very occasionally, usually when I want something easy to read, something I don’t want to have to concentrate on. The synopsis of Barefoot Girls didn’t really sound like your stereotypical chick-lit however, but it still seemed like it would share chick-lit’s easy readability. That’s why I accepted it. It’s also why I read it when I did, after 1Q84 I wanted something easy to read.

Having read it now though I think maybe that calling it chick-lit does it a bit of a disservice. It certainly has elements of your stereotypical chick-lit. There’s a love interest and a related problem (although it’s one that really related to a more serious side of the novel, which makes it more than a stereotypical love story), it’s easy to read- the language isn’t too complex- it’s generally speaking plot driven, it’s focused around women, all pretty much things you would expect from chick-lit. However there’s a more emotional element which can sometimes be found in the better chick-lit, chick-lit with brains I like to call it. There’s a mystery element of the type you find in more general contemporary fiction and which keeps you guessing. There’s a certain crime element too which adds an extra plot line.

Overall I did like it. Certainly I like Hannah, one of the main characters, and Zoeey. I think possibly I was meant to like Keeley more, but I just couldn’t connect to her, and Amy kind of grated on me. Seeing as it was essentially a book about friendship however I did like their friendship and how it was depicted, although there was a certain element of wondering how they remained friends, especially as some of the scenes where you saw one of the characters on their own didn’t seem to fit with the way they were when they were together. Maybe that just showing the things friendship bring out in a person though?

I like the mystery element as well, and how that mystery effected the characters- especially Hannah. I must admit however I guessed the twist long before it was revealed- although I kept wondering how it came about.

The only thing I didn’t really like was the Rose storyline. It seemed a bit pointless and rather than feeling dramatic it really just made me feel sorry for Rose. I didn’t really think it was needed- it felt almost as if McTiernan added it just for a bit of action.

3.5/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£3.89)

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5 Reasons to Leave a Lover- Carolyn Moncel


Image from Amazon

I was given a copy of 5 Reasons to Leave a Lover free of charge in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis (from Amazon)

In 5 Reasons to Leave a Lover, author Carolyn Moncel offers up a fresh batch of stories based on love and loss. As singer/songwriter, Paul Simon so eloquently suggested in a famous song from the 1970s, there are many ways to leave a lover. However, Moncel’s characters demonstrate that the reasons for leaving in the first place are quite finite. Encounters in Paris` Ellery and Julien Roulet return, picking up their lives where the short story, “Pandora`s Box Revisited,” ends. This time the Roulets are involved in a love triangle, and along with two other couples, must explore how love relationships are affected and splinter due to abuse, ambivalence, deception, cheating and death. This bittersweet collection of tales proves that some breakups are necessary; while others are voluntary; and still others are simply destined and beyond anyone’s control.

Review

I am not usually a reader of short stories, I think I have only ever reviewed one other here before. I thought this one sounded interesting though. I’m not sure interesting is still the word I would use but it is entertaining. I wouldn’t exactly call it chick-lit but it is pretty close. It’s an easy read (took me less that a day) and about romance which are features stereotypically found in chick-lit, but it is less happy than chick-lit normally is. I did have the same problem I have with most short stories, it felt like it ended to soon…or at least I found that I wanted to be able to keep reading it, when it came to the first story anyway. I must say the main story was well enough written that I felt for the characters, and I could see different sides of the story. I did feel the other two stories were unnecessary though, they just seemed like padding and weren’t long enough for me to get any real feeling about them.

I would be interested in reading a longer novel by Moncel though.

3/5

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West End Girls- Jenny Colgan


Synopsis (from Amazon)

The streets of London are paved with gold …allegedly. They may be twin sisters, but Lizzie and Penny Berry are complete opposites – Penny is blonde, thin and outrageous; Lizzie quiet, thoughtful and, well, definitely not thin. The one trait they do share is a desire to DO something with their lives, and as far as they’re concerned, the place to get noticed is London. Out of the blue they discover they have a grandmother living in Chelsea – and when she has to go into hospital, they find themselves flat-sitting on the King’s Road. But, as they discover, it’s not as easy to become It Girls as they’d imagined, and west end boys aren’t at all like Hugh Grant …

Review

Not much to say about this one, just pretty standard chick-lit fare. Predictable from early on, but strangely satisfying. I read chick-lit to be lazy, and this certainly filled the bill. No great story, no great writting, but an easy comfortable read.

3/5

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One Day- David Nicholls


Cover

Image via Wikipedia

Synopsis (from Amazon)

‘I can imagine you at forty,’ she said, a hint of malice in her voice. ‘I can picture it right now.’
He smiled without opening his eyes. ‘Go on then.’

15th July 1988. Emma and Dexter meet for the first time on the night of their graduation. Tomorrow they must go their separate ways.

So where will they be on this one day next year?

And the year after that? And every year that follows?

Twenty years, two people, ONE DAY. From the author of the massive bestseller STARTER FOR TEN.

Review

Ok here goes. I know lots of people love this book, I’m read so many fantastic reviews, and maybe I’m missing something but I was less than impressed. I wasn’t expecting One Day to be so chick-litty, I have nothing against chick-lit as such but I rarely read it and when I do it’s because I want an easy, lazy read, and that means I have to know it’s chick-lit first. I found it somewhat predictable, to the point that I was getting frustrated at the length of time it took for the inevitable to happen (highlight for spoiler)and of course it did happen, eventually. I suppose it was romantic in a way, the idea of fate, but it’s nothing new.

I didn’t like the characters either. I thought that Dexter was a bit of an idiot honestly, and so self-centred. He took advantage of Emma and I didn’t think he was good enough for her. Emma I found kind of smug, not exactly self-assured but at the same time rather self-satisfied, despite her criticisms of herself. Emma did at least grow on me though (highlight for spoiler) however I wasn’t sad so much as shocked when she had died.

I did find the end quite good, and realistic. (highlight for spoiler) I thought the emotion of loss was done much better than that of love. I could imagine myself reacting in similar ways to Dexter. The ending really saved this story, and actually I would have liked more of it.

2.5/5

And if you’re asking what I think you may be the answer is yes 😉

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Things I want my Daughters to Know- Elizabeth Noble


This review was written on 12/08/10. It is the last of my back-dated reviews.

Synopsis (from Amazon)

‘My beautiful girls. If you’ve read this, you’ll know it contains some – not all, but some – of the things I want my daughters to know. And the greatest of these is love …’ How would you say goodbye to those you love most in the world? Barbara must say a final farewell to her four daughters. But how can she find the words? And how can she leave them when they each have so much growing up to do? There’s commitment-phobic Lisa. Brittle, unhappily married Jennifer. Free-spirited traveller Amanda. And teenage Hannah, stumbling her way towards adulthood. Barbara’s answer is to write each daughter a letter, finally expressing the hopes, fears, dreams and secrets she couldn’t always voice. These words will touch the girls in different – sometimes shocking – ways, unlocking emotions and passions to set them on their own journey of discovery through life.

Review

Hmm main thing which struck me about this book was it was more chick-litty than I expected, pretty good chick-lit but still more than I was expecting. I have nothing against chick-lit but I only usually pick it up if I’m after an easy read, I enjoyed it enough but if I realised how chick-litty it was I don’t think I would have been looking forward too it so much. It also didn’t have as much actual grief narrative as I was expecting- in a way it was just an added dimension, all the other problems were seperate really the only way it was connected was in how the daughters couldn’t speak to their mother which was a bit of an over used comment- why didn’t they talk to her about any of their problems when she was alive- they would have surely if they suddenly wanted too? It just seemed to be put in to link back really- to stop topic straying too much.
Overall an enjoyable enough read but don’t expect it to be anything great

3/5

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The Chocolate Run- Dorothy Koomson


Cover of "The Chocolate Run"

Cover of The Chocolate Run

This review was written 2/07/09

Synopsis(from Amazon)

Amber Salpone thinks in chocolate – talk to her for three minutes and she’ll tell you what kind of chocolate you’d be. In fact, most days, if she was asked to choose between chocolate and relationships, there’d be no contest. At least chocolate has never let her down. Unlike her family. Growing up in the Salpone household has taught Amber to avoid conflict – and love – at all costs. So, when she does the unthinkable and has a one-night stand with womaniser Greg Walterson, her uncomplicated, chocolate-flavoured life goes into meltdown. Especially when Greg announces she’s the love of his life – and Amber finds it hard enough to decide if she wants plain or Fruit & Nut …Meanwhile, her best friend, Jen, seems to be launching a bid to become Bitch Of The Year and Amber’s family are making unreasonable demands. Amber has two choices: to deal with her past and the people around her, or to go on a chocolate run and keep on running …

Review
I picked this one up because I fancied something easy and a bit trashy. In that sense well it was chick-lit so it didn’t exactly disappoint. Having said that it was a bit different in ways than usual chick-lit, it wasn’t about a woman seeking commitment, rather running away from it, which was an element I liked about it. In other ways though it was quite formulaic (highlight for spoiler)you know the kind of thing boy and girl are friends who don’t realise they should be together, they get together, there is some sort of argument and they split up, they realise they can’t live without one another and get back together. Having said that for a while I did think that it might not be so predictable (highlight for spoiler) and thought they wouldn’t get back together, I was glad when they did.
I liked Amber, but I didn’t really like the other characters, I didn’t like Greg, (highlight for spoiler) and up to a point even hoped they wouldn’t stay together. But it didn’t spoil the book for me.

3/5

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The Jane Austen Book Club- Karen Joy Fowler


Cover of "The Jane Austen Book Club"

Cover of The Jane Austen Book Club

This review was written 25/5/09

Synopsis(from Amazon)

Six people, five women and a man  meet once a month in California’s Central Valley to discuss Jane Austen’s novels. They are ordinary people, neither happy nor unhappy, but each of them is wounded in different ways, they are all mixed up about their lives and relationships. Over the six months they meet, marriages are tested, affairs begin, unsuitable arrangements become suitable  under the guiding eye of Jane Austen a couple of them even fall in love.

Review

Don’t really have much to say about this book. It wasn’t bad but it wasn’t great either, just pretty much middle of the road. Maybe I would have got more out of it if I was an Austen reader but I’m not! I didn’t feel a particular attachment to any of the characters, I quite liked Greig and I found Prudie a bit cold but I didn’t really care that much about any of them. It was an enjoyable enough read but I’ve read plenty better

3/5

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Life on the Refrigerator Door- Alice Kuipers


Cover of "Life on the Refrigerator Door"

Cover of Life on the Refrigerator Door

This review was written 9/4/09

Synopsis (from Amazon)

Beautifully told through notes left on their kitchen fridge, this is an intimate portrait of the relationship between a hard-working mother and her teenage daughter. Stunningly sad but ultimately uplifting, it is about being a ‘good mother’ or a ‘good daughter’, and is a reminder of how much can be said in so few words, if only we made the time to say them.

Review

This is quite a nice little book, quite simple and a quick easy read, it only took me about an hour. As someone whose Mum has gone through breast cancer I could connect quite well with Claire’s character, not sure whether to worry or just try to act as if everything was normal and would be ok. In a way I found the idea of notes a bit unrealistic, I didn’t think such important things would be discussed on notes, or at least not to that extent, even though sometimes it is easier to write things down. I also think the book could have been better if

(highlight for spoiler)the mother had lived. I don’t know why really, I guess I would have liked to see how they coped with the aftermath. However the letters from Claire after her mother had died were very touching

In all if you don’t have much time, or just want something easy to read this is a quite good choice as it still has some of the touching elements which are usually only in more challenging books, but if you want a story about cancer there are probably some better ones out there

3/5

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Diary of a Married Call Girl- Tracy Quan


This review was written 2/2/09

Synopsis (from Amazon)

The witty, sexy sequel to Tracy Quan’s bestselling “Diary of a Manhattan Call Girl”. Like everyone, Nancy finds that as life goes on, she has to adapt. She’s learning to hone her respectable image as the wife of investment banker Matt, cooking fashionable meals and taking his shirts to the cleaners, while turning a few tricks on the side. Volume is down, but the sex is kinkier. And she finds herself pulled into the discreet subculture of the married call girl. Some women’s husband’s know what they do, some don’t, and some ‘know, but don’t know.’ Nancy’s is in the dark, although her best friend Allison’s increasing presence in the media spotlight threatens to expose Nancy’s secret. Meanwhile, Matt wants a baby, but Nancy isn’t so sure. Motherhood could end her career for good – and what will it do to her body? Will Nancy have to give up her career to save her marriage? What if she becomes the frumpy wife her clients often come to her to escape? Fans of Quan’s first Nancy Chan novel, readers of Candace Bushnell’s “4 Blondes”, and anyone who enjoys a walk on the wild side will love this revealing romp.

Review
I read the first two books in this series when I was a teenager and quite enjoyed them. I don’t remember the other two having quite so much sex in them, although of course they had some, it would be difficult to write a book about a ‘call girl’ without any sex in it! I remember there not being as much sex as you would expect in the first 2, but I can’t say that of this one.
It’s a pretty simple book really, and a simple story- nothing unexpected. Enjoyable enough but nothing special really. It was nice to read something easy and it was at least more exciting (for want of a better word) than Rachel Ray. As far as chick lit. type books are concerned it’s not the best Iv’e read but by no means the worst either.

3/5

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Filed under Chicklit, Fiction review