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One of these days…


…I will start writing proper posts again, but it’s Tuesday (or at least it was when I started his post), so I thought I would do a list of things which are distracting me from my blog…

  1. Netflix/amazon prime first it was The Thick of It, then Outnumbered, then Being Human, Mad Men, Mr Robot, Orange is the New Black and now The Gilmore Girls. Plus I’ve been watching Jane the Virgin on 4OD, and The Big Bang Theory, and New Girl, and The Goodwife (which I should stop watching because it stopped being decent several seasons ago)
  2. The house being a home owner when your also a lazy person takes a lot of time! Getting ready to clean the house (i.e. 1 and saying I’m getting up, honest), actually cleaning the house, food shopping, cooking and that’s when we’re doing pretty much none of the DIY jobs that need doing
  3. Pokemon Go, yeah I’m one of those! Totally addicted! But it gives me exercise, which I do need
  4. Being lazy, yeah, well that’s always been a problem!
  5. Work, not that I’ve had stuff to do at home, just that it’s been busy. End of year so much to do in preschool, which makes 4 worse
  6. Heathstone- maybe I should have just said computer games, but this one is holding less attention now.

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The Hundred and Ninety-Nine Steps- Michael Faber


Synopsis (from amazon)

Note: I don’t like this synopsis, but it’s the best of a bad bunch and I can’t write a better one myself, so…yeah

Siân, troubled by dark dreams and seeking distraction, joins an archaeological dig at Whitby. The abbey’s one hundred and ninety-nine steps link the twenty-first century with the ruins of the past and Siân is swept into a mystery involving a long-hidden murder, a fragile manuscript in a bottle and a cast of most peculiar characters. Equal parts historical thriller, romance and ghost story, this is an ingenious literary page-turner and is completely unforgettable.

Review

This is more a novella than a novel, which suits my reading habits right now.

The synopsis makes it sound more exciting that it really is, it’s more interesting than exciting. The story carried on nicely though, and was quite beautifully written, it’s no Crimson Petal and the White but it fills the gap well enough.

There’s not really that much of a story to it. The letter offers some intrigue, but it isn’t really used to the best it could be, and the romance was a bit everyday.

I did enjoy it enough though to be disappointed when my kindle copy ended at around 60%, and I felt a bit ripped off, I must admit the customer service at canongate were very good when I complained on twitter though.

Both editions listed below also contain the novella ‘The Courage Consort’

3/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£4.53)

Paperback (£8.99)

 

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Top 10 Tuesday: Books to Sink Into


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s freebie week so I’ve decided to do Ten Books to Sink Into. That is books which swallow you up. Books you can’t put down. Books you read above other things (which for me would be netflix, Hearthstone, and getting off the bus at the right stop!) .Books where you have to read ‘just one more chapter’. Books you don’t want to end.

They might not be literary greats. They are rarely growers (although a grower may become a book to sink into, it’s not a complete book to sink into). They may not even be books you remember, but they are books that at the time really hooked you

The Shell Collector- Hugh Howey

I finished this one yesterday, and considering how my reading has been of late I read it really quickly. It’s an easy read but involving. It is about a journalist who is writing an expose on a family of oil tycoons who she blames for wreaking the world.

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns)- Mindy Kaling

I had to watch the American version of the office after reading Mindy’s first autobiography just so I wouldn’t loose her. Why isn’t The Mindy Project back yet?

Fangirl- Rainbow Rowell

I have a history of reading Rainbow Rowell on the bus and then sitting at the bus stop because I have to finish the last little bit (it happened with Landline too). This one about a fanfiction writer and her twin starting university is my favourite though

The Rosie Project- Graeme Simison

This funny and quirky book really drew me in. It’s about a man, Don who is trying to find the perfect women, although going about it in maybe too much of a scientific manner. I’ve recently read the sequel, The Rosie Effect which I enjoyed but didn’t quite have the same hook

Charlotte Street- Danny Wallace

I remember little real content of this book, other than that it was a sort-of romance and involved a lost camera. I do remember that it left me buzzing though, and that I devoured it

Handle With Care- Jodi Picoult

I pretty much devour any Picoult, but this is my favourite. About a mother suing her midwife who missed a birth defect in her daughter.

Captain Corelli’s Mandolin- Louis de Bernieres

Although as a whole I preferred The War of Don Emmanuel’s Nether Parts to de Bernieres more well known novel, Captain Corelli’s was more compelling to read (if you ignore the first chapter). It tells the story of an Italian army captain billeted to a Greek island during WW2 and how he falls in love with a woman who should be his enemy.

Harry Potter Series- J.K. Rowling

Well if you’ve been a visitor for a while you probably know how much of a Potter nut I am

Shades of Grey- Jasper Fforde

There is meant to be a sequel to this fantastic dystopian book book coming out, but will Fforde ever finish it (George R,R Martin fans may think they have it bad but I’ve been waiting  almost a decade for the next Shades of Grey book)

Texts From Jane Eyre- Mallory Ortberg

This funny little book of texts literary characters and authors might write is great for flicking through and quickly digestible.

 

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Deals of the Moment- April 2016


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


The Double Comfort Safari Club- Alexander McCall Smith

I really enjoy the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency books, but I haven’t got as far as this one yet

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Lost and Found- Tom Winter

A nice little book about a woman writing letters to nobody, and the postman who finds them

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


 

Round Ireland With a Fridge- Tony Hawks

Tony Hawks is one of those comedic writers, like Dave Gorman, of the type that was very popular a few years ago, part comedian part travel writer, This one is about him hitchhiking around Ireland with a fridge.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Wool- Hugh Howey

The start of Hugh Howey’s much praised trilogy, and the best of the three in my opinion, set in a future where there survives just one silo of people.

You can buy it…here  (only £1.99)

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The Seed Collectors- Scarlett Thomas


Synopsis (from goodreads)

Aunt Oleander is dead. In the Garden of England her extended family gather to remember her, to tell stories and to rekindle old memories. To each of her nearest and dearest Oleander has left a precious seed pod. But along with it comes a family secret that could open the hardest of hearts but also break the closest ties…

Review

I adored Pop Co. and loved The End of Mr Y, but the Scarlett Thomas books which I’ve read since have been a bit disappointing, not not good, just not as good. So I approached The Seed Collectors with a mixture of excitement and apprehension.

I think with The Seed Collectors Thomas is getting back to the writer I love, the writer who I was excited to see new books by. I think the gap between this book and her last was bigger, and maybe that shows.

It’s still not as good as Pop Co. It took more time to fall into- more like The End of Mr Y- but I ended up loving it all the same.

It wasn’t exactly what I expected, I expected it to mainly be a book about the seeds, but it wasn’t really about the seeds much at all. I suppose you could say it was a story about a family, but that makes it sound boring. This isn’t some ‘normal’ family, everything is screwed up. Plus some of the people are vile, ok all of the people are pretty awful (so if you like to love your characters, this probably isn’t the one for you).

To be completely honest it’s not really very plot driven, but I really enjoyed it all the same and found myself reading it in the same sort of incessant way that I would normally only read a plot driven book in.

4.5/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£5.22)

Paperback (£6.74)

Hardback £13.48)

Other reviews:

Have you reviewed this book? Leave me a link in comments

 

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Which do I buy?


Help! I have a £10 amazon voucher and a list of 10 books I want. I can buy 3.

Which do I buy?





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Deals of the Moment- December


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. In this post I talk about the interesting deals which I might buy or which I’ve already read.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


Bad Pharma- Ben Goldacre

I’ve heard lots of good things about Ben Goldacre, in this book he talks about the problems with medication trials.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Dirt- Mötley Crüe

When I read this autobiography of Mötley Crüe  I enjoyed it so much more than I had expected. It’s not for everyone, it sometimes goes out of it’s way to offend or disgust you, but I really enjoyed it

You can buy it…here (only £1.49)


When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit- Judith Kerr

I mentioned this autobiography in my Top 10 Books Set During Wartime post. A very good account of a family fleeing the Nazis

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)

 


Stardust- Neil Gaiman

A boy goes over a wall in search of a shooting star, but finds more than he expected. Loved this one.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


The Gun Seller- Hugh Laurie

This has been on my wishlist for so long that I’d forgotten what it was even about. Still sounds really good though, it’s about an assassin with on conscience.

. You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


 

 

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A Tale For The Time Being- Ruth Ozeki


Synopsis (from amazon)

Ruth discovers a Hello Kitty lunchbox washed up on the shore of her beach home. Within it lies a diary that expresses the hopes and dreams of a young girl. She suspects it might have arrived on a drift of debris from the 2011 tsunami. With every turn of the page, she is sucked deeper into an enchanting mystery.

In a small cafe in Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao Yasutani is navigating the challenges thrown up by modern life. In the face of cyberbullying, the mysteries of a 104-year-old Buddhist nun and great-grandmother, and the joy and heartbreak of family, Nao is trying to find her own place – and voice – through a diary she hopes will find a reader and friend who finally understands her.

Review

‘A Tale for the Time Being’ marks the beginning of what I am calling my return to ‘normal’ reading, ok still not completely normal for me- I’m reading one book at a time rather than two. I’d had a few single books which have held my attention since my return to blogging, but now I’ve had a bit of a run, and I hope it’s not just due to the books I have chosen. (You can read a bit about my lack of reading here). Is it ‘A Tale for the Time Being’ which made me be able to come back to my old reading levels? I’m not sure, but I do know that I enjoyed it, I do know that I wanted to read it above other activities which require less concentration (and which I had been holding my interest more than reading), and II do know that since reading it I have read a number of other books which have held my attention (which I intend to review in due course).

So, yes, I really did enjoy ‘A Tale For the Time Being’, but actually I don’t know if I have anything significant to say about it.

It did take me a little time to get into, but once I did get into it I didn’t want to stop. I especially wanted to know what had happened to Nao, and Ruth’s story helped fuel that as she got so absorbed in Nao’s story.

I liked Nao’s voice. It made subjects which were sometimes very emotional easy to read, and her story really did sounds like she was telling it to a friend who she was slowly getting to know.

I certainly recommend it. Although if you can go for a paper copy rather than an ebook, I read the ebook and all the footnotes were at the end of the book, which doesn’t really work when you can’t flick through it!

4.5/5

Buy it:
Paperback (£8.99)
Kindle (£5.29)

Hardback (£16.59)

Other reviews:

The Relentless Reader

Words for Worms (contains spoilers)

Fay Simone

As the Crowe Flies (and Reads)

Curiosity Killed the Bookworm

 

 

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Furiously Happy- Jenny Lawson



Synopsis (from amazon)

In Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, Jenny Lawson regaled readers with uproarious stories of her bizarre childhood. In her new book, Furiously Happy, she explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea. And terrible ideas are what Jenny does best.

As Jenny says: ‘You can’t experience pain without also experiencing the baffling and ridiculous moments of being fiercely, unapologetically, intensely and (above all) furiously happy.’ It’s a philosophy that has – quite literally – saved her life.

Review

I loved Let’s Pretend This Never Happened so I was excited when I heard Jenny Lawson (aka The Bloggess) had a new book coming out.

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened was hilarious, so I was expecting the same from Jenny’s new book. It was very funny, but it had more of a serious side than her first book had. I still liked it, but it wasn’t as easy a read.

This one featured a lot about Jenny’s mental illness. That made it less light, although a lot lighter than you would expect of a book which has a high content about mental illness. She had a philosophy of always being Furiously Happy when her illness would allow her. A way to show that she could have a good, happy, time, a way to say that that illness is not her.

Jenny says she wrote this book with people who have the same problems as her in mind. So I wasn’t exactly the target market, but I still found the book pretty uplifting, and I definitely enjoyed Jenny’s sense of humour.

If you loved the first one you can’t go wrong with this, but I think you may be better off starting with the first.

4/5

Buy it:

Hardback (£12.08)

Kindle (£7.49)

Paperback: pre-order (£8.99)

Other reviews:

Alison McCarthy 

Words For Worms

Did I miss your review? Leave me a link in comments and I will add it here

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Top 10 Books Set in War Time


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s Top 10 Books set for… my old post on books set in wartime has been one of the most popular in the lifetime of my blog, so I’ve decided to update it. Some of the books are the same, some have changed.

Links lead to reviews, pictures lead to amazon. In no particular order.
When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, Judith Kerr, book, book cover

1) When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit- Judith Kerr is a semi-autobiographical book which features a Jewish family fleeing from Nazi Germany. It’s one of the first World War novels I can remember reading, although I read a lot around the same time (most notably Carrie’s War, Goodbye Marriane, Goodnight Mister Tom, The Peppermint Pig), and it’s the first of a series of three books.

 

Regeneration, Pat Barker, book, book cover

 

2) Regeneration- Pat Baker Pat Baker has written a fair few war novels (I’ve reviewed Double Vision on the blog, which is more modern) but the Regeneration trilogy is by far her best (of what I’ve read, anyway). It is set in a hospital where shell-shock victims are treated, with the aim of sending them back to the trenches

 

Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks, book, book cover
3) Birdsong- Sebastian Faulks this love and war story was a favourite of mine for a long time.

 

 

 

The shouting wind, linda newbery, book, book cover
4) The Shouting Wind- Linda Newbery, a favourite of mine as a teenager. All about a girl working for the RAF (as a sort of air controller) during WW2 who falls in love with one of the pilots. It’s the first of a series which follows three generations of a family, but it’s the best.

 

5) A God in Ruins- Kate Atkinson follows the life of Teddy, a significant part of which includes him being in the RAF. Very emotive.

 

 

 

Hotel on the corner of bitter and sweet, Jamie Ford, book, book cover
6) Hotel at the Corner of Bitter and Sweet- Jamie Ford tells the story of a Chinese boy, with a Japanese best friend who lives in America during the time of Pearl Harbour. It’s a side of the war which is more rarely covered. When I wrote the original version of this post I said that this was one of the best books set during wartime which I’d read recently, it still remains a firm favourite

 

Sarah's Key, Tatiana de Rosnay, book, book cover

7) Sarah’s Key- Tatiana de Rosnay As with The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, Sarah’s Key is based on a less covered side of the war. This time in occupied Paris, and with rounding up of Jews there. It is heart wrenching. Since writing the original version of this post I think I’ve come to appreciate Sarah’s key more, certainly parts of it stick rather significantly in my memory.

 

 

Remembrance, Teresa Breslin, book, book cover
8) Remembrance- Teresa Breslin another book I read as a teenager, and it remains one of the best war novels I’ve read. Follows five young people through WW1, the most memorable scenes for me were with the young woman who became a nurse.

 

 


9) The Book Thief- Markus Zusak sad bit also beautiful story of a girl living in Germany during WW2. The story is narrated by death and includes a hidden Jewish man amongst other things. The film is well worth watching too

the almond tree, book, book cover

10) The Almond Tree- Michelle Cohen Corasanti the only one on my list which is not set during the world wars. This one is about the Israel/Palestine conflict, and it’s my recommendation of the moment.

Special mentions:Pegasus Falling: indie book about a paratrooper who ends up in a concentration camp, and his life afterwards.

Gone With the Wind: not strictly a war book, although it does feature the war of independence.

– Captain Correli’s Mandolin: More of a love story set during the war really.

The Kommandant’s Girl: about a Jewish woman in Poland during Nazi occupation who is hidden in plain sight and become the girlfriend of a Nzi Kommandant to help the resistance.

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Deals of the Moment- April 2016


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Whenever there are deals of interest I post on here. Links are associate links but money goes back into the blog.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


Missing Rose- Linda Newberry

I loved Linda Newberry as a teenager, in fact her book The Shouting Wind still holds a place in my heart (and remains one of the best war novels I’ve ever read), but I’ve only ever read one of her books written for adults. So Missing Rose, which is about a girl whose sister goes missing, sounds interesting to me

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Shakespeare- Bill Bryson

Still, somehow, the only Bryson I’ve ever read. Interesting and entertaining, definitely recommend if you are interested in Shakespeare. I read it during my short burst living in Stratford.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Not much this month, but some of the deals from last month are still on, so worth a check on those too.

 

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The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly- Matt McCarthy


Synopsis (from amazon)

In medical school, Matt McCarthy dreamed of being a different kind of doctor the sort of mythical, unflappable physician who could reach unreachable patients. But when a new admission to the critical care unit almost died his first night on call, he found himself scrambling. Visions of mastery quickly gave way to hopes of simply surviving hospital life, where confidence was hard to come by and no amount of med school training could dispel the terror of facing actual patients.

Review

McCarthy’s autobiography is an interesting and eye opening look into the American healthcare system. It would be interesting to see how it differs from a doctor’s experience in the NHS.

I must admit that I expected to see lots about patients who couldn’t afford the healthcare that they need, the idea of no NHS is not one I like, and I never really understood people who are against ‘Obamacare’ in the US. There was a little bit of that, but in was only really a very small part of the book, and I wouldn’t even say it was particularly hard hitting. At one point McCarthy was interning in the medical centre, which seemed pretty much like a drop in centre would be here in the UK, except that the same patients would keep returning. I say like a drop in centre because the treatment seemed rushed, and fairly basic, for example medication over other possible solutions which a specialist might recommend. Plus it seemed like it was mainly run by interns, which suggested a lack of continuity of care. McCarthy found that it was difficult to get to grips with the patient notes because there was a rush and lots of notes to read. He found reading just the latest notes wasn’t enough, but reading further took too much time. Part of this I think was to do with his approach, but it seems that with this patients would end up falling through the gaps.

There was also a section where he went to se and treat the homeless. This bit was too brief I felt, but he only did it for one night. There was certainly enough to give me admiration for people who do it. I think this bit would be pretty much the same in the UK, I imagine homeless people easily don’t see GPs, or go to appointments at hospitals, just because they are hard to keep contact with, and I’m not even sure if you can register with a doctor if you don’t have an address.

Anyway I am going on somewhat of a tangent. I really enjoyed this book. There were plenty of ups and downs and at times you thought that maybe Matt wasn’t cut out for it. After all being a doctor is one of those jobs where a mistake can really cost someone, even to the point of death. But everyone has to start somewhere and it was a real eye opener on how hard things are for doctors, especially those still training.

The hours were absolutely ridiculous. I mean you’d think that you want someone that important to be as sharp as possible when they were working, but the long days meant that was practically impossible. It certainly gave me more sympathy for the junior doctors over here (and I already supported them).

Despite the subject having the potential to be either over emotional or too dry I thought McCarthy did a really good job. There was emotion when it mattered, but it a way you had to be like a doctor and not get too bogged down in the emotions- and the way McCarthy wrote helped with that. He actually made it quite an easy read, and entertaining, which I hadn’t expected. I had expected it to be interesting, and it was, but I did expect it to be so entertaining. I thoroughly recommend

5/5

Buy it:

Hardback (£22.50)

Paperback– preorder (£11.23)

Kindle (£21.38)

Other Reviews:

Sam Still Reading

Did I miss your review? Leave me a link in comments and I will add it here

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Sunday Surfing 13/3/16


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

The Booker Prize Longlist has Been Revealed

This Young Gil Opened a Library in the Slums

Men Give Up on Books Quicker Than Women Do

And on the blog this week…

 

I reviewed ‘The Radleys’

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The Radleys- Matt Haig


Synopsis (from amazon)

Life with the Radleys: Radio 4, dinner parties with the Bishopthorpe neighbours and self-denial. Loads of self-denial. But all hell is about to break loose. When teenage daughter Clara gets attacked on the way home from a party, she and her brother Rowan finally discover why they can’t sleep, can’t eat a Thai salad without fear of asphyxiation and can’t go outside unless they’re smothered in Factor 50.

With a visit from their lethally louche Uncle Will and an increasingly suspicious police force, life in Bishopthorpe is about to change. Drastically.

Review

The Radley’s was on my wishlist for years, before I read The Humans, before The Humans was even released. I have a problem, I add things to my wishlist and never buy them, because when I’m in a bookshop (or to a lesser extent on an online store) I get distracted by books which are not on my wishlist, and end up buying them. I think I ended up buying The Radleys because it was on kindle deal.

I’m trying to think how to review without spoiling.

It’s somewhat of a coming of age novel, although not in a classic sense, because the thing which is making the Radley children grow up is not exactly normal. Also that there is a sort of coming of age novel for the parents too- who says you have o be a teenager to ‘come of age’?

At times it was sort of predictable, but that’s ok, I enjoyed it anyway.

3/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£8.99)
Kindle (£5.69)

Other reviews:

Reading With Tea

Leeswammes’ Blog

Knitting and Sundries

Curiosity Killed the Bookworm

B Reading

Did I miss your review? Leave me a link in comments and I will add it here

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Sunday Surfing 6/3/16


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

Writer Louise Renson has Passed Away. I remember reading the Georgia Nicholson books as a teenager.

Axel Scheffler has Said There Would Have Been ‘No Gruffalo Without (the) EU’

 

Beatrix Potter’s Lost Book is Being Released. This is the Cover

Le Prix de la Page’ Literary Prize Picks books by Reading Just to Page 112

Reasons to be Proud of Being a Book Horder

The Library is Allowing People to Donate Food in Lieu of Fines

Writers With Strange Deaths

And on the blog this week…

Lots of great kindle deals this month

 

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Deals of the Moment- March 2016


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Usually I tweet about the interesting deals and leave it at that, but a couple of months ago I decided to try sharing them more widely. There was nothing of interest last month but this month they have holiday offers too and there are a few interesting offers there

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


The End of Your Life Book Club- Will Schwalbe

Thoughtful and a little sad memoir about the last month of Schwalbe’s mother’s life.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close- Jonathon Safran Foer

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close has been on my wishlist since I read, and loved, Everything is Illuminated. Just goes to show how long things stay on my wishlist. Will almost definitely be buying this one. It’s about a kid who finds a key in his Father’s closet (his father was killed in the 9/11 attacks) and tries to find out what it is.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Chocolat- Joanne Harris

Chocolat was the first Joanne Harris book I read, and still the best. About a woman who opens a chocolate shop in a French village during lent. It’s a little bit magical, and draws a great picture of the town, and also the chocolate!

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)

 


Thirteen Reasons Why- Jay Asher

This is another one which has been on my wishlist for a long time, I think after reading a review on another blog. It’s about 13 reasons why a teenager committed suicide. Not sure I’m up for it at the moment, but may buy it for the future.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Nineteen Minutes- Jodi Picoult
I love Jodi Picoult and I’ve read all her solo novels. Nineteen Minutes is about a school shooting. The shooter and an important witness, who doesn’t seem to be able to remember some key information.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)



Love Anthony- Lisa Genova

This is another one I’m seriously considering. After really liking Still Alice and enjoying Left Neglected. I like Genova’s blend of informative medical information and human emotion. This one is about a mother who looses her autistic son.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


Plain Truth- Jodi Picoult

Another Picoult. This one about an Amish woman accused of the murder of her new born, and illegitimate baby.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Mother Tongue- Bill Bryson

Another I’m very tempted by. I’ve been meaning to read more Bryson, and I like books about language so this one about the English language seems ideal.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


My Sister’s Keeper- Jodi Picoult

Yeah, another one. This is one of my favourites. About a girl, who, after a lifetime donating for her sister with cancer, decides to say no.

Buy it …here (only £1.49)

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Sunday Surfing 29/2/16


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Apparently I haven’t posted a Sunday Surfing for six months (thanks for that jolt of reality wordpress) so I’m posting some older links too.

Around the web this week

 

This bookshop is giving a discount to people who ‘open carry’ guns

The most borrowed library books in the UK

Reading for pleasure could make you happier

Popular names invented by authors -I don’t get the whole call it a baby name thing, it’s not like we shed names as we grow up)

Simon and Schuster are releasing an imprint for Muslim children’s books -don’t really get why it needs a separate imprint but it’s good that they are trying to get more books with non-white children.

Bones of woman who inspired ‘Tess of the d’Urbervilles’ may have been found

 

And on the blog this week…

I talked about the ballet of Raven Girl

I reviewed Why Not Me?

 

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Filed under general, Memes, Sunday Surfing

Why Not Me?- Mindy Kaling


Synopsis (from amazon)

Mindy Kaling has found herself at a turning point. So in Why Not Me?, she shares her ongoing journey to find fulfilment and adventure in her adult life, be it falling in love at work, seeking new friendships inunlikely places, or attempting to be the first person in history to lose weight without any behaviour modification whatsoever.

Review

I love Mindy’s show The Mindy Project, when I read her first book last year I adored her even more, I watched The US version of The Office just because I needed a Mindy fix (despite being a bit against American adaptations as a general rule, and yeah actually I was proved wrong on that one). When I heard she had a second book coming out I was excited, but I was finishing buying a house, and was on a self inflicted book buying ban (and well, even on amazon the paperback is almost £10, that’s a lot for a paperback…yeah I’m like that).

In the end I got it as a Christmas present, and it was the first of my present books which I read. I did really enjoy it, but I think I prefered her first. I think the first one was just a bit more accessible. In the first book she wasn’t famous, or becoming well known I suppose. It just meant a lot of what she talked about was a bit more recognisable. In Why Not Me for a good part she was well known, and for some I would go as far as to say she was famous. Her stories, whilst still entertaining didn’t quite have that same sense of reality.

I think it was a bit less thought provoking too. There were still elements which were thought provoking, but not in a way that hit me like the occasion with the dress in Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?

Part of the problem I had I think was that there was so much build up for me. I was excited from back when I knew the book was going to exist. That’s quite a while to anticipate something.

I still love Mindy. I would still recommend this book, I did really like it, but it is less memorable than her first for me, and I don’t think it quite meets up to it.

4/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£9.09)
Kindle (£9.49)

Other reviews:

Bookjourney

Alison Mccarthy

Chris Book-a-rama

 

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Raven Girl Ballet


Back when I reviewed Raven Girl the book I mentioned that there was a ballet coming out. Well I went with two friends. My friends hadn’t read the book, and the only ballet I’d ever seen before was them dancing at uni (which isn’t really the same as professional ballet). So I think we made quite a good little group to go together.

In some ways I think it might have been better if I didn’t have prior knowledge of the book because I kept getting lost trying to work out which part of the book things were. When I spoke to my friends about this they said that ballet tends to go off on pretty tangents, so it might not have been any particular part of the story.

However I’m not sure if I would have understood what was going on without having read the book.

The dancing was rather beautiful, and I loved how they used images from the book along wth the dancing. Plus some bits were really clever.

It was jointly done with the ballet Connectome and I think I actually enjoyed that more just because I was enjoying the ballet itself rather than trying to find a story.

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Wool Series- Hugh Howey


The Wool series consists of 3 books; Wool , Shift and Dust

Synopsis (written by me, because there isn’t just one)

Years in the future a civilization, the only survivors on earth are living in a silo. Outside the air is poison. The Wool series of books looks at how this came to be, and how things started to fall apart.

Review

Note on the review: Because I read Wool, Shift, and Dust one after the other I have decided to review them all in one go rather than as separate books. Because of this I’ve decided to use a sort of key code. Anything in black refers to all the books and isn’t a spoiler. Anything in red refers to Wool, there may be spoilers for Wool but won’t be any spoilers for previous books. Anything in green refers to Shift, it may contain spoilers for Shift or Wool. Anything in purple refers to Dust, it may contain spoilers for any of the three books.

I bought Wool (and later Shift and Dust) for my partner initially. There were quite a few reviews around at the time (I definitely remember that Ellie reviewed Dust) and I thought the books sounded good, but not quite me. These sorts of sci-fi things are more my boyfriend’s taste. However when he enjoyed it I thought I would give it a read too.

Overall I did enjoy the series although for all the books I found they started slow and after a while became more interesting. I must admit as well that I found my interest in the series overall wavered with each book, so although I fairly enjoyed Dust, it had significantly less pull than Wool did.


By the end of Wool I was really looking forward to starting Shift and seeing what happened next. My boyfriend warned me I would be somewhat disappointed, and he was right because Shift doesn’t continue on from where Wool left off, instead it jumps back to when the silos were new and gradually moves to the same time but in silo one- head silo- and how the events in Wool effect that silo.

I still enjoyed Shift by the end, it was interesting to see another side. It was also interesting how Jules almost became the enemy. Or I suppose I should say how it didn’t seem like the plans we learnt about in Wool were so bad after all. They seemed somewhat good intentioned.

I sort of wish things had stayed that way, where you can see both sides of the coin, but Dust changed it into bad plans again. I think it would have been more interesting to see Jules and silo one discussing her problems with what they were doing and maybe finding a solution.

Dust’s start was rather disappointing. It didn’t start where Wool had left off but jumped a little further forward, and I think partly because of this things were a little confusing. Jules seemed to know a lot but it was difficult to understand how she knew a lot of it. Of course I could have forgotten what exactly had happened in Wool which may have marred my impression of Shift.

 

Would I recommend the series? I don’t know. A lot of promise seems unfulfilled, but I did enjoy reading them, so maybe

3/5

Buy it:

Wool (from £4.99)
Shift (from £4.99)
Dust (from £4.99)

Other reviews:

Leeswammes’ Blog Wool | Shift

Curiosity Killed the Bookworm Wool | Shift

Quirky Bookworm Wool

The Sleepless Reader Wool

Did I miss your review? Leave me a message in comments and I’ll add it here

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Filed under Contempory, Dystopian, Fantasy, Fiction review, YA

The Tiger’s Wife- Téa Obreht


Synopsis (from amazon)

Natalia is on a quest: to discover the truth about her beloved grandfather. He has died far from home, in circumstances shrouded in mystery.

Recalling stories her grandfather told her as a child, Natalia suspects he may have died trying to unravel two mysteries. One was the fate of a tiger which escaped during German bombing raids in 1941; the other a man who claimed to be immortal. But, as Natalia learns, there are no simple truths or easy answers in this landscape echoing with myths but still scarred by war.

Review

I read the first chapter of this book back in 2011 when it was in the first Waterstone’s Eleven. It went on my wishlist then, but it’s was only towards the end of last year that I actually read it.

There are four stories in this novel. That of Natalia as a child and her relationship with her Grandfather. The story of Natalia now. And the two stranger stories, those of the tiger’s wife, and the deathless man. All the stories are meant to be true, the stranger stories being stories which Natalia’s grandfather told her about his life.

The stranger stories are what make the book really. They have an almost fairytale like quality. I especially liked the tale of the deathless man because it had elements which seemed more real than that of the tiger’s wife, but they were contrasted in the idea of this man who couldn’t die. The idea of a woman falling in love with a tiger was less supernatural I suppose, it’s more how much it was believed I think that was unusual.

I did enjoy the writing in this book, however I’d find I got interested in one story only for it to stop and give way to one of the others, and then I’d stop reading because I didn’t want to read that other story. Even though I liked each story on it’s own I wasn’t ready to leave one for another, and that meant it took me a surprisingly long time to read for such a short book.

(Isn’t the new cover awesome?)

3/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£7.99)

Kindle (£4.99)

Other reviews:

Word by Word

Lit and Life

Nose in a Book

Page Turners

Literary Lindsey

Did I miss your review? Leave me a link in comments and I will add it here

 

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Filed under Contempory, Fiction review, Historical, Literary

Look Who’s Back- Timur Vermes


Synopsis (from amazon)

Berlin, Summer 2011. Adolf Hitler wakes up on a patch of open ground, alive and well. Things have changed – no Eva Braun, no Nazi party, no war. Hitler barely recognises his beloved Fatherland, filled with immigrants and run by a woman.

People certainly recognise him, albeit as a flawless impersonator who refuses to break character. The unthinkable, the inevitable happens, and the ranting Hitler goes viral, becomes a YouTube star, gets his own T.V. show, and people begin to listen. But the Führer has another programme with even greater ambition – to set the country he finds a shambles back to rights.

Review

This book has had some controversy. Mainly focusing about is it right to write a humorous book about Hitler? I think the main problem people see in it is that it sort of makes light of Hitler and in doing so somehow makes light of what he did.

I think the people who say this miss the point somewhat however. It’s a book about Hitler in the basics, but really it’s more about the media and how life now views Hitler. He’s seen as a sort of spectacle. Think of all the tourist destinations which wouldn’t be there if it weren’t for Hitler. Is this about the point of not forgetting so it can’t happen again? Or is it more of a morbid curiosity or some sort of extended rubbernecking?

I think it shows how something similar could happen again. Hitler in this book became known and famous. Maybe he would never have been taken seriously as a politician, but the start of it was there. It does make me think somewhat of the popularity of people like Trump, many people are against him, but he also has a certain amount of support- and that could be dangerous.

On the surface this is a humorous book, and it did make me laugh. You could probably read it just as an entertaining read if you wanted to. If you didn’t feel the need to justify it.

It won’t be for everyone. I know it’s something that could offend. I understand why. But I liked it.

4/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.29)

Kindle (£4.99)

Hardback (£13.49)

Other reviews:

Plastic Rosaries

Did I miss your review? Post a link in comments and I will add it here

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Filed under Contempory, Fiction review, Historical, Humour

Deals of the Moment- February


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. Usually I tweet about the interesting deals and leave it at that, but a couple of months ago I decided to try sharing them more widely. There was nothing of interest last month but this month they have holiday offers too and there are a few interesting offers there

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews.

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


The Uncommon Reader- Alan Bennett

This is one I’ve read already. An enjoyable, easy little read which should go down well with book fans. About the Queen visiting the library.

You can buy it…here (only £2.29)


The Colour Purple- Alice Walker

This is one of those ‘must read’ books and I read it back in school.  I only remember it very vaguelly, but I do remember enjoying it.

It’s the story of a black girl during segregation who has all sorts of problems (not just those to do with being black.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Lingo: The Language Spotters Guide to Europe- Gaston Gorren

I remember seeing this some time ago in paperback and considering it, more for my Mum than myself. It does look interesting, it’s about languages and dialects and how they evolve.

You can buy it…here. (only £1.99)

 


Delusions of Gender- Cordelia Fine

I’ve had this one on my kindle for literally years, but somehow never been in the mood to actually read it. IT does sound like a good read though, about how science is making sexism seem logical.

You can buy it …here (only £1.09)


The Life of a Banana- PP Wong

This is one I’ve heard good things about so may buy. About a Chinese girl who is ‘white inside’.

You can buy it…here (only £0.99)


 

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Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking-Anya Von Bremzen


Side note: So yes it’s been a while. Me and the boyfriend just moved into our very own house a few months ago, and with everything that needs doing, and organising we didn’t really have much time for internet (or we shouldn’t have…) so we only got our internet connected last week. But yay I’m back and hoping to post a bit more regularly, although my focus is still off a bit. I have quite a few reviews to catch up on so I should get on it really!

Synopsis (from amazon)

Born in a surreal Moscow communal apartment where eighteen families shared one kitchen, Anya von Bremzen grew up singing odes to Lenin, black-marketeering Juicy Fruit gum at school, and longing for a taste of the mythical West. It was a life by turns absurd, drab, naively joyous, melancholy and, finally, intolerable. In 1974, when Anya was ten, she and her mother fled to the USA, with no winter coats and no right of return. These days, Anya is the doyenne of high-end food writing. And yet, the flavour of Soviet kolbasa, like Proust’s madeleine, transports her back to that vanished Atlantis known as the USSR .

Review

It’s been a while since I actually read this, so my review may be a little sketchy, although I at least have a few general thoughts which I knew I wanted to share.

This book it a bit difficult to put into a box, part memoir, part biography, part history book, part food book, part cookbook. It all sort of fits together, although it has a bit of a flighty nature jumping between present day and the past- and not just Anya’s past, her parent’s past too, and her grandparents. It sort of makes a bit of a clash, although the historical bits are more or less in order sometimes it is difficult to connect different events, especially when it becomes more history than biography. Maybe it’s meant to be like that- with the idea of the gap between the government and the general population. It’s hard to connect what she says about the government with what it happening ‘out there’.

I did find it a little slow at first for this reason. I found Anya’s first hand accounts easier to connect with and found I wanted to read the book more when she was a young girl in the narrative, probably it is easier to narrate something which has happened to you personally.

I didn’t get the same sort of sense of amazing food from the food descriptions as I have in other books about food, maybe because I don’t really have any experience of Russian cuisine. Having said that I’ve wanted to try foods from descriptions before, and a lot of the time the descriptions given by Anya were expecting prior knowledge.

I did like the way that history was told with food as a starting point, it made it accessible, and the parallel between those who ate whatever they could get and those who had whatever they wanted was interesting.

3/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£8.99)

Hardback (£16.54)

Kindle (£4.99)

Other Reviews:

2,606 Books and Counting

Have I missed your review? Leave me a link in comments and I’ll addd it here.

 

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Filed under food, History, Memoir, non-fiction review

Review of the Year 2015


Hey, I’m finally writing a post! I’ve just moved house (to my own home, how exciting!) and our internet isn’t up and running at the moment (which considering the masses of things that I have to do might actually be a good thing) so I’m writing this from my Dad’s house.

What with one thing and another my concentration has been pretty low this year, and it really has impacted on my reading. I’m finding I’m more likely to give up on books, and I’m taking longer to read the books I am sticking with. I certainly haven’t tackled many more difficult books over the last year.

Because of this I have decided just to do the one review of the year post this year, focusing on my favourites.

The Stats

Read: 40

Fiction: 31

Non-fiction: 9

Unfinished/abandoned: 3

Best fiction

Raven Girl- Audrey Niffenegger

Says something that my favourite book this year is a graphic novel. Wonderfully  strange and beautiful. I’ve seen the ballet too which I hope to review soon.

Best non-fiction

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?- Mindy Kaling

I love Mindy, and I loved her even more after reading this. Funny, thoughtful and light hearted. Probably actually my favourite read of the year overall. I’ve just read her latest too. Also really good but not as good as her first

 

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Bookish Gifts 2015


It’s that time of year again. If you (for some reason) don’t want to buy a book for your bookish friends then maybe you could buy one of these instead:

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All of the years at Hogwarts in one picture

$31.20 from Society 6

 

 

 

 

 

normal_chocolate-miniature-books

Little chocolate books

£9.99 from Not on the High Street

 

 

ravenclaw-necklace-horcrux-vintage-antique-silver-eagle-crown-font-b-diadem-b-font-pendant-jewelry-for

Ravenclaw Diadem Necklace

$28.80 from Ali Express

 

 

 

 

9780764970610

Alice in Wonderland calender

£10.99 from Foyles

 

 

 

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Golden Snitch earrings

£104.95 from Etsy

 

 

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‘A Book is a Dream You Hold in Your Hands’ t-shirt

$22.00 from Society 6

 

 

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Bookshelf Wallpaper

£59.99 from 1 Wall

 

 

 

bookworm-n4s-cases

iphone case

$35.oo from Society 6

 

 

 

 

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Back in September I went of hiatus from this blog. I have been thinking for a few weeks that maybe I am ready to come back, but had a lot of deliberating about how to come back.

Part of me wanted to give an explanation, part of me wanted more than that, part of me just wanted to dive back in as if nothing had happened.

But this blog has been going a while and I feel I owe something to my readers.

In September my Mum died. She had secondary breast cancer. Her death was something we expected but her condition got a lot worse very quickly. I miss her everyday and I didn’t want to have to think about updating this blog.

I did think of making a little obituary type post, with a bookish slant, but whilst I feel prepared to start making my steps back into the book blogging world I do not feel ready to discuss things so openly, and I feel that my words could not express what I would really want to say.

I did however want to say something because I can’t promise that my blog will fully come back to itself. The Children’s Hour feature in particular was something I shared with my Mum, and if I’m just not feeling like posting I won’t. Plus I have found that I have less concentration, which means that maybe I read a little less and a little slower, and can’t quite cope with more complex books.

I will be here, but for now I would say I am just dipping my feet in.

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On Haitus


This blog is currently on hiatus.

I am still reading comments and messages but not currently accepting review requests

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Top 10 Tuesday: Toddler’s Top 10 Books


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

 

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s a free choice so I decided to do The Toddler’s Top 10 Books. That is books which the toddlers that I’ve worked with over the years have loved. I started working with the pre-schoolers a couple of weeks ago so I thought this would be a nice way to close that period of time.

In no particular order.

I’m Not Cute- Jonathan Allen

I’m Not Cute is about Baby Owl who everyone thinks is cute, but he says he isn’t. It’s consistently popular with the toddlers, even as the groups change. We also love ‘I’m not Reading’ and ‘I’m Not Sleepy’ which are about Baby Owl

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt- Michael Rosen

A sort of modern classic. A poem in essence about going on a bear hunt and the obstacles encountered

 

Cock-a-Moo-Moo- Juliet Dallas-Conte

Another that has been popular with different groups. A funny little story about a cockerel who forgets how to crow.

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

This one has been popular for a long time, and it’s popular with the babies too. Very simple. Each animal being asked what they see. The kids can ‘read’ it to themselves. Special mention to ‘Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?’ which is similar but about sounds and the kids also love.

Shh! We Have a Plan- Chris Haughton

This one is a current favourite, the kids ask for ‘The blue book’. It’s about some men trying to catch a bird. The pictures are key

Don’t Wake the Bear, Hare!

This is an old favourite, but stayed popular for a long time. The animals are having a party, bt they don’t want to wake the sleeping bear.

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Monkey Puzzle- Julia Donaldson

A personal favourite. About a monkey trying to find his Mum. Of course Julia Donaldson is basically queen of picture books.

The Animal Boogie- Debbie Harter

A favourite singing book. Complete with CD. Special mention for ‘Walking Through the Jungle’ another song book we’ve loved

Some Dogs Do- Jez Alborough

About a year ago the kids always asked for this book which is about a dog who finds he can fly. I really disliked it.


Painter Bear- Vivianne French

The kids loved the way my collegue used to read this story- telling painter bear off.

What books do you like to read to your kids? Or which picture books did you like growing up

 

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Filed under general, Memes, Top 10 Tuesday

Double Dexter- Jeff Lindsey



Double Dexter is the sixth novel in the Dexter Series.

Synopsis (from amazon)

Everyone’s favourite serial killer is back and deadlier than ever…

A witness. Such a simple concept – and yet for Dexter Morgan, a perfectly well-disguised serial killer, the possibility of a witness is terrifying. As an upstanding blood-spatter analyst for the Miami Police, Dexter has always managed to keep the darker side of his life out of the spotlight. An expert at finding truly bad people – murderers who’ve long escaped justice – Dexter has long been giving them his own special brand of attention.

But now someone has seen him in the act. Dexter is being followed, manipulated and mimicked, leading him to realise that no one likes to have a double – especially when his double’s goal is to kill him.

Dexter is not one to tolerate such displeasure … in fact, he has a knack for extricating himself from trouble in his own pleasurable way.

Review

I’ve recently finished watching Dexter on netflix which made me want to read more of the series (which I hadn’t read so far because of the size of my to be read pile) so I borrowed ‘Double Dexter’ from the library. The TV series is pretty much a completely story to the books, so one doesn’t spoil the other, although if you try to compare them it just makes you annoyed that the TV series is so different, and that I suppose is what made me want to keep reading the books. The TV series is good, as a TV series, just not as an adaptation.

In ‘Double Dexter’ Dexter is, well, different. He gets seen and that puts Harry’s Code under threat, because he has to deal with this new threat.

One thing I really feel shows skill when it comes to Jeff Lindsey’s  writing is how he makes the reader actually feel sympathy with Dexter. It makes some sort of sense in the other books because the people who he murders are murderers themselves, it’s a sort of vigilante justice. That isn’t true in Double Dexter, because the person who he is trying to kill did nothing criminal- he just saw Dexter at his work. However we still feel sympathy for Dexter.

One thing though I tend to get with the Dexter books (and I have mentioned it before) is that sometimes Dexter seems very slow. I’m not sure if that is just that I’m cleverer than Dexter, or if there has become a certain predictability with the books.

This one though is the first time I’ve got frustrated with Dexter for other things. Like how he expects Rita just to have the dinner on the table. Sort of sexist. Except is he sexist or is he just single minded? Because it’s always been like that does he just not question that maybe it shouldn’t be like that?

3/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.74)

Kindle (£5.99)

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Children’s Hour: The Time it Took Tom


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
The Time it Took Tom has been fairly popular with the toddlers, and more popular with the pre-schoolers.

In the story Tom finds a tin of paint, and decides to paint to living room…completely! The story talks about the time it took, and the time the events after took.

The toddlers like the simpler parts of the story as Tom is actually painting, but they tend to loose interest in the longer bits that describe how they fixed it. It’s a good book to talk about time, and there is a lot of extra story in the pictures as you see Tom’s Mum out of the window.

The pictures are by Nick Sharratt and of the style which tends to be popular with kids

Buy it:

Paperback- new or used (from £3.40)

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Sunday Surfing 6/9/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

A Group of Authors Are Raising Money for Syria. Different authors are matching £10,000 each, as I type they’ve raised over £860,000 you can donate here

Books to Read if You Love Haruki Murakami

How Books Changed This Prisoner’s Life

How Reading Books is Better to Reading e-books

Bookish Sand Sculptures

Why Books Are Dangerous

It’s been a while since I’ve put a video in here but I couldn’t resist this little bookworm

 

And on the blog this week…

 

Blogiversary Giveaway

I Reviewed ‘Hallucinations’

The Kids Read ‘Dinosaur Kisses’

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Children’s Hour: Dinosaur Kisses


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
I’ve read Dinosaur Kisses to both toddlers and pre-school, but it went down better with the younger ones.

The story is about a dinosaur who sees a kiss and wants to copy, but keeps getting it wrong.

It’s very simple, probably too simple for a pre-schoolers, at least I think that’s why they appreciated it less. The toddlers though liked all the noises included in the narrative, and found it funny when the dinosaur got it wrong.

Personally I liked the pictures which were very cute. and I had imagined it as being more a book for the toddlers than the pre-schoolers.

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

Hardback (£11.99)

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Hallucinations- Oliver Sacks


Synopsis (from amazon)

Have you ever seen something that wasn’t really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing?

Hallucinations don’t belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness, or injury. In some conditions, hallucinations can lead to religious epiphanies or even the feeling of leaving one’s own body. Humans have always sought such life-changing visions, and for thousands of years have used hallucinogenic compounds to achieve them.

In this book, with his usual elegance, curiosity, and compassion, Dr Sacks weaves together stories of his patients and of his own mind-altering experiences to illuminate what hallucinations tell us about the organisation and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture’s folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all, a vital part of the human condition.

Review

Oliver Sacks is probably generally seen as one of the most accessible neuroscientists of modern times.  Considering that, and my interest in psychology it’s quite surprising that I haven’t read anything by him before now. I can see why he is seen as accessible from his writing style, however I did find Hallucinations a little hard-going, more because of repetitiveness than anything else.

The book was split into sections based on causes of hallucinations (e.g. particular illnesses, sensory reasons, drugs), which made sense in some ways, however it also meant that when more than one cause for a particular type of hallucination could be found a description of that type of hallucination would be given in each chapter about each cause. There were different first-person accounts, which was interesting in it’s own way because different people hallucinate different things, even within a set type of hallucination. Even that did have some repetitive air to it though.

Having said that it was very interesting. I think Sack’s main aim was to make hallucinations more acceptable. They are generally seen as a sign of madness, and they can be that, but usually they aren’t, there are many more things that can cause them, and lots of different presentations of hallucinations which many people wouldn’t consider.

In fact he described what one would call a migraine aura usually as a type of hallucination which is interesting. I suppose calling it an aura makes it seem less serious or scary- but is that just because of a sort of stigma put on the idea of hallucinating. I do sometimes find migraine auras distressing- would they be more distressing if I called them hallucinations? Anyway it just shows that hallucinations aren’t all what one’s first thoughts of hallucinations would be. They aren’t always ‘real’ things. They aren’t always pictures even.

I did find it very interesting, and it probably changed my view of hallucinations a bit. It could have done with a bit of editing though. I’ll certainly read more by Sacks, and I already have Musicophilia and Migraine on my wishlist.

Oliver Sacks sadly died this weekend, which is what prompted me to write this review over the others that are waiting to be written.

3.5/5

Buy it:

Paperback (£7.49)

Kindle (£4.49)

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Blogiversary Giveaway 2015


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It was my blogiversary yesterday (6 years, can you believe it?!) so I’m running a giveaway to celebrate.

The prize is your choice of any book mentioned in my review of the year posts, so long as it is sold on The Book Depository

The giveaway is open internationally if The Book Depository does free shipping to your country.

You don’t need to follow my blog to enter, but can earn extra entries by following in any of a few different ways.

Enter Here

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Sunday Surfing 30/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Which YA Book to Read Based on Your Favourite Disney Princess

The Benefits of Reading Before Bed

A Japanese Bookseller Bought Most of the Copies of Murukami’s Latest Book to Hold Off The Online Sellers

The Best Selling e-books of 2015 (so far)

‘American Gods’ is Being Adapted For TV

Oliver Sacks, Neuropsychologist and Writer Has Died

And on the blog this week…

Food in Literature 101

The Kids Read ‘I’m Not Sleepy’

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Children’s Hour: I’m Not Sleepy


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
I’m Not Sleepy is another story about our favourite Baby Owl. I borrowed it from the library because the toddlers love Baby Owl

In this one it’s Baby Owl’s bedtime, but he doesn’t want to go to sleep because

“I’m NOT sleepy”

even though he’s yawning, and stretching, and even closing his eyes.

It’s much more like ‘I’m Not Cute‘ than ‘I’m Not Reading‘, which I prefer as a it’s a bit simpler and easier to follow, plus there’s much more of Baby Owl shouting, which we all like.

There are different animals to the animals in ‘I’m Not Cute’ which is interesting for the kids, and as with ‘I’m Not Cute’ the kids love naming the animals, as well as joining in with the shouting.

It’s probably our second favourite library book, after ‘Shh! We Have a Plan

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

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Top 10 Tuesday: Food in Literature 101


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s Top Ten Books That Would Be On Your Syllabus If You Taught X 101 .

Welcome to Food in Literature 101. In this course we will be looking at books and scenes in books where food is important. Eating in this class is not only allowed but encouraged. This is your required reading:

Chocolat- Joanne Harris

The descriptions of chocolate in this book are graphic enough to mean you need a bar of chocolate to hand when reading it

Great Expectations- Charles Dickens

Specifically the scene where Pip meets Miss Havisham in her decaying wedding reception.

 

A Little Princes- Frances Hodgeson Burnett

Again specifically the scene where Sara and Becky are really hungry so they imagine a magnificent feast.


The Book Unholy Mischief- Ellie Newmark

When a homeless boy is caught stealing a pomegranate by a chef the chef takes this as showing the superior taste of the boy so he takes him in to be a chef’s apprentice.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- Roald Dahl

Food plays a role in a lot of Roald Dahl work (the cake in Matilda, the peach in James and the Giant Peach, for example), but Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has the most feed in it. For a more full look at food in Roald Dahl take my second year class.



Like Water For Chocolate- Laura Esquivel.

This book has recipes as part of the story.One at the begginning of each chapter

Brooklyn Bites Short Stories- Scott Stabile

These short stories have food as a pivotal part of the plot. Technically 3 books, but they’re all very short.

 

 

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Sunday Surfing 23/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

Run a Bookshop, as Your Holiday

Jonathan Franzen Considered Adopting an Iraqi Orphan so he Could Learn about Young People. I don’t even know where to start with this one

The Book that Claims it Can Put Your Child to Sleep

Why Bedtime Stories Are Good for Kids

Play the tumblr Book Themed Game

And on the blog this week…

I Talked About What is Happening With Libraries in Birmingham

The Kids Read ‘Shh! We Have a Plan’

 

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Children’s Hour: Shh! We Have a Plan (revisited)


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.

I first wrote about Shh! We Have a Plan after I bought it for my nephew. When I saw it at the library a couple of weeks ago I decided I should share it at nursery too, especially considering how much they had loved Oh No, George! I think I made a pretty good choice because it’s almost certainly the toddler’s favourite book of the ones I got from the library (which is really saying something because one of them was a Baby Owl book).

Shh! We Have a Plan follows four men who are trying to catch a bird. Three of them are trying to use stealth and creeping up on the bird, the other is being very friendly, much to the annoyance of the other three

“Shh! SHH! We have a plan”

The kids like the simplicity of the words which make it very easy for them to join in, and they especially like saying

“Hello Birdy!”

along with the fourth man. They love looking out for the bird, and are becoming increasingly competent at describing what is happening in the pictures. Both make them feel a sense of achievement.

The pictures in the book tell as much of the story as the words do, which makes it almost like the children are making up the story for themselves. The pictures are simple but rather beautiful. I like how everything bar the birds are in blue which makes the bird stand out so you can see why the men want to capture it.

Buy it:

Paperback (£5.24)

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Birmingham Libraries in Trouble


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Library of Birmingham (photo by me)

So what I had feared is happening. Birmingham, yes, cannot really afford its lovely new library. I was concerned from the beginning (well sort of) that the opening of a fancy, new, and- yes- expensive library would effect the libraries in Birmingham as a whole.

First the hours were cut and staff were let go. Now apparently new fiction is not being bought- there’s just no budget. I fact reportedly some Birmingham libraries have been asking for donations for their shelves.

I love the Library of Birmingham. It is a beautiful building, and of course all the books. However I never really saw a problem with the old one at least it terms of it’s purpose as a library. You couldn’t exactly call it beautiful, but it had books, and places to read them, which is the important thing really. It’s nice to have a library which isn’t a concrete monstrosity, but I’d rather have the old old library back based on the pictures I’ve seen, apparently at the time it was too ‘showy’ though, and the knocked it down when the ugly new library (of the time) was built.

Victorian Library (source)

The Library of Birmingham is probably the library I use the most (there are others closer to home, but I travel through town every day. It is certainly a nice library to have as my main library, although the decreased opening hours have meant that it’s often already closed when I am travelling through town on the way home.

That fiction is being cut I think really shows the attitude that libraries and reading are a luxury. Is this true though? Whilst non-fiction may be more intellectually enriching, fiction is, at least generally speaking, more emotionally enriching. Is that the type of society we really want? Where intelligence is rated above compassion or empathy? Plus reading has been shown to have good effects on mental health which is surely a good thing.

Old central library (source)

Again it is the poor that are getting hit. Those for whom the library is their only, or their main source of books. I am lucky. I can afford to buy more books than I really ‘need’. I have a pile of books waiting to be read which could last me a few months, and enough Waterstone’s points to buy three or four books if I’m really desperate.

However I remember a time when I used the library a lot. I did much of my studying for my GCSEs there, and spent a lot of time there during my holidays. I was a frequent visitor at the school library. If it wasn’t for the library- and yes, especially the fiction section I wouldn’t be the reader I am today.

Reading isn’t a luxury. Reading is a way of life, and in a world where there are so many other things to distract potential readers shouldn’t we be putting more into our libraries, not taking away from them. Books create a person, books are a lot of what I am, not just a reader, but my personality too. I hate to think of a world where this access to self is lost.

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Sunday Surfing 16/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Mistakes You May Be Making When Reading 

Books in a Tweet, Do They Encourage Reading?

Why Paper Books Won’t Die (long but worth the read)

Why Mark Haddon Doesn’t Mind That ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime’ Has Been Censored

The Books Obama is Reading This Summer

Bad Things Are Happening to Libraries Here in Birmingham

Fake Books in Film

Are You Living in a Haruki Murakami Novel?

And on the blog this week…

Authors I’ve Read the Most Books From

The Kids Read ‘Ruby Roars’

 

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Children’s Hour: Ruby Roars


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
Last week I went to the library to pick some books for the kids (let’s not go any further into this library business here or I may start getting angry) Ruby Roars is one of the books I picked. I’ve been in pre-school a lot this week and they seem to have taken to Ruby Roars, which is strange because they didn’t seem that engaged when I read it first time, I suppose they must have been more interested that I thought though because they asked for it again.

Ruby Roars is about a Tasmanian devil who is learning how to roar. She tries out lots of different noises but can’t seem to scare anybody. Eventually she finds the perfect word and scares everybody.

The kids like the noises which increase in their volume (or at least they do when I read it!). They find it funny I think to see you being a bit silly (which is sort of strange because half my job is being silly, you’d think they would expect it by now). It was because of the noises that I picked the book out, so I’m glad I was right

Buy it:

Paperback (£6.99)

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Top 10 Tuesday: Top Ten Authors I’ve Read The Most Books From


Top 10 Sites I Visit that AREN'T About Books

It’s Tuesday again so The Broke and the Bookish are hosting Top Ten Tuesday.

This week it’s Top Ten Authors I’ve Read The Most Books From I’m using my Goodreads so not sure this is 100% correct, but more or less. Title links are for reviews. Most books read is first:

Enid Blyton

27 books read. It wasn’t until I started counting until I realised how many Enid Byton books I’ve read. All the Adventure series, all the Secret Seven, 1 Famous Five, 3 Twins at Saint Clare’s. Mostly borrowed from the library as a child. I feel  I should do better.

Jodi Picoult

25 books read. All her solo written books and kindle shorts except Wonder Woman and Leaving Home.

Jaqueline Wilson

21 books read. For a few years in junior school (and the beginning of secondary school) I read all of the Jaqueline Wlson books I could get my hands on. I may still have one somewhere, and I still want to call my child Lottie after The Lottie Project.

Roald Dahl

15 books read. Most of his children’s ones, as a child. I intend to try out his adult stories at some point


J.K. Rowling.

13 books read. All the Harry Potter’s plus Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Quidditch Through the Ages and Tales of Beedle the Bard. The Casual Vacancy and her books as Robert Galbraith.

Judy Blume

13 books read. A good chunk of her YA novels. I should really try one of her adult novels at some point.

Paula Danziger

13 books read. Around about the same time I was reading Judy Blume.

Noel Streatfeild.

13 books read. Again in childhood.

Jasper Fforde

10 books read. 7 Thursday Next, 2 Nursery Crimes, 1 Shades of Grey (when oh when will that second one come out!)He’s got a new one coming out next year too, a stand-alone novel, how exciting!

Charlaine Harris

19 books read. First 10 Sookie Stackhouse books. I was in a bookring on the Bookclub Forum, but it stopped at book 10 and I was never that bothered to seek out the last 3.

I think my list is pretty telling about how my reading habits have changed. When I was younger I used to find a book I liked then try and read everything by that author. Now I read more eclectically meaning that it’s only favourite authors who I keep returning too, or if I’m reading a series I will read a lot by one author

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday Surfing 9/8/15


bird surf

Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week.

Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

 

A Night at the Harry Potter Hotel

Could You Answer Questions Asked of Booksellers?

This 7-year old Created a Comic About a Girl With Magic Afro Puffs

Which Margaret Atwood Should You Read?

What One Female Author Found When She Send Her Manuscript Under a Male Name

The First Books Authors Loved

Misconceptions About Harry Potter Fans

And on the blog this week…

Deals of the Moment

The Kids Read ‘Tip Tip, Dig Dig’

I Reviewed ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’

 

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The Ocean at the End of the Lane- Neil Gaiman


Synopsis (from amazon)
It began for our narrator forty years ago when the family lodger stole their car and committed suicide in it, stirring up ancient powers best left undisturbed. Dark creatures from beyond the world are on the loose, and it will take everything our narrator has just to stay alive: there is primal horror here, and menace unleashed – within his family and from the forces that have gathered to destroy it.
His only defense is three women, on a farm at the end of the lane. The youngest of them claims that her duckpond is an ocean. The oldest can remember the Big Bang.

Review

Neil Gaiman started off writing ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’ as a short story for his wife when they were apart, but it just kept growing. You can sort of tell that he was thinking about her at the time. The narrator keeps speaking about stories or books as a comfort and an escapism, I can see that as being what Gaiman intended this story to be for his wife. I put a few of the most interesting quotes on my tumblr, but I think this one sums it up the best:

“I went away in my head, into a book. That was where I went whenever real life was too hard or too inflexible “

In a way it is more ‘adult’ than the other books I’ve read by Gaiman. I think it’s because it’s narrated by the main character as he looks back. It’s more introspective and that gives us the sort of insight that a present narrator wouldn’t give. Looking bak he could see things which he might not see at the time.

It still had the normal Gaiman fantasy and action-y bits which stopped it being too thoughtful, but actually I preferred the times when the narrator was just thinking. The thoughtful times I suppose.

There’s some interesting messages in it too about an adult’s relationship with his own childhood. About how looking back can be a comfort, and about how we never really loose that childhood part of ourselves, it’s just often hidden by life.

3.5/5

Buy it:

Kindle (£0.99)

Paperback (£3.85)

Other reviews:

Reading is the Ultimate Aphrodisiac

Under a Gray Sky

Alison Mccarthy

Curiosity Killed the Bookworm

An Armchair by the Sea

Words for Worms

Chrisbookarama

Did I miss your review? Post a link in comments and I will add it here

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Children’s Hour: Tip, Tip, Dig, Dig


Children’s Hour is a feature here at Lucybird’s Book Blog every Thursday where I’m looking at children’s picture books. As I work in a nursery I get plenty of opportunities to look at picture books, and to see what the kids think of them so it really makes sense to use those experiences.

I’d love to hear everybody’s experiences of the books I review too, and feel free to post me a link to your own reviews, I’d love to make this a bit interactive.

The image (if you were wondering) is taken from Shirley’s Hughes’ Alfie and Annie-Rose books which I loved as a child.
The kids really liked Tip, Tip, Dig, Dig There’s a bit of a story to it, about how the different building equipment are going to fix problems but it’s more about the repeated refrains of what they do, e.g. tip, tip. The kids can join in and learn about what the different equipment does at the same time (which is good because everything is apparently a digger!). The problems are asked about so the kids can guess what the answers are too e.g. “Look at all this mess! What can we do with it?”

The pictures are very appealing, being bright and fairly simple.

Buy it:

Boardbook (£4.99)

Paperback (£10.19)

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Deals of the Moment- August


Every month amazon has a set of kindle monthly deals. This in the post where I talk about any books which are of interest.

So I’m going to briefly talk about the books I’ve read which are on offer, and those that I have bought myself. Why I liked them/bought them, and what they are about. End links are to the amazon page, any other links are to my reviews. Amazon links are affiliate links but any money made goes back into the blog (e.g. for giveaways)

Please note prices are correct at time of publishing and may be subject to change.


Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas- Hunter S Thompson

I may buy this one because it’s on The Rory List, although I’m not sure how ‘me’ it is.  Plus it’s very popular. It’s about drugs and the ‘American Dream’

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Virgin Suicides- Jeffrey Eugenides

I love Jeffrey Eugenides writing, and especially liked Middlesex. The Virgin Suicides is a sort of modern classic. About a family of girls who all commit suicide.

You can buy it…here (only £1.99)


Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet- Jamie Ford

This is one of my favourite World War novels. It’s about the Japanese community in America during WW2.

You can buy it…here. (only £0.99)


The Happiness Project- Gretchen Rubin

I’ve heard some fantastic things about this book, but again I’m not sure if it’s one for me, it seems a bit self-helpy for my taste. However I may give it a go. It’s a sort of autobiography showing the various methods Rubin used to gain happiness and how they worked out for her

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


Keeping Faith- Jodi Picoult

I am a big Picoult fan, I’ve read all her books. Keeping Faith is about a kid who starts hearing God. She ends up with a lot of attention, but so much rubbish is going on in her life, is she really hearing God?

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Storyteller- Jodi Picoult

Yes another Picoult one. This is about an ex-Nazi SS solider who wants forgiveness. Not a ‘usual’ Picoult but very good

Buy it…here (only £1.49)


Anita and Me- Meera Syal

Anita and Me was one of the first ‘adult’ books I read. It’s about an Asian girl growing up in a predominately white town, and wanting to fit in.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao- Junot Diaz

This is one of those books everyone says you ‘have’ to read. It’s about a geek who lives in a dream world- basically.

Buy it…here (only £2.59)


Charlotte Street- Danny Wallace

I loved this book when I read it. It’s a bit like Nick Hornby in style. About a man who tries to find a woman whose disposable camera he accidentally took.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


Kommandant’s Girl- Pam Jenoff

Kommandant’s Girl is probably my favourite Pam Jenoff (at least so far). It’s about a girl who gets together with a German Kommndant to help the resistance during WW2.

Buy it…here (only £0.99)


The Ocean at the End of the Lane- Neil Gaiman

I just finished this one (it’s a Summer deal rather than a monthly). I highlighted a lot of quotes (see a few on my tumblr). It’s sort of insightful, a coming of age novel, but with the usual Gaiman fantasy element (yeah, can you tell I still need to write my review?)

Buy it…here (only £0.99)


Still Alice- Lisa Genova

A very moving book, and sad. About a woman with early-onset dementia.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)


The Hunger Games- Suzanne Collins

If anyone doesn’t already have it! It’s a dystopian book about a ‘game’ played every year where basically kids have to kill each other off, sort of based on Battle Royal. I really liked it.

Buy it…here (only £2.19)


Eleanor and Park- Rainbow Rowell

Not my favourite Rainbow Rowell, but still great. Geeky. It’s a love story, but more too.

Buy it…here (only £1.99)

 

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Sunday Surfing 5/7/15


bird surf Sunday Surfing is my weekly feature (inspired by Chrisbookarama‘s Friday Bookish Buzz, which is one of my favourite features) where I share my favourite links from during the week, about books and blogging. Plus a little about what’s happened on the blog this week. Let’s get started.

Around the web this week

Books Children Should Read Before Finishing Primary School (according to teachers)

The Trailer For ‘Mockingjay Part 2’ is Out

And So is the Trailer for ‘Room

Picture Books Which Go Against Girlish Stereotypes

Read the First Chapter of ‘I Am Malala

The Man Booker Longlist was Revealed

And on the blog this week…

I Reviewed ‘Is Everybody Hanging Out Without Me?’

Lucybird’s Book Blog is now on tumblr

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You can now follow Lucybird’s Book Blog on tumblr

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